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Sci Rep. 2017 Jun 6;7(1):2883. doi: 10.1038/s41598-017-02889-5.

The anti-cholesterolaemic effect of a consortium of probiotics: An acute study in C57BL/6J mice.

Author information

1
Cultech Limited, Unit 2 Christchurch Road, Baglan Industrial Park, Port Talbot, SA12 7BZ, United Kingdom. darynm@cultech.co.uk.
2
Cultech Limited, Unit 2 Christchurch Road, Baglan Industrial Park, Port Talbot, SA12 7BZ, United Kingdom.
3
Cardiff School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Sir Martin Evans Building, Museum Avenue, Cardiff, CF14 3AX, United Kingdom.
4
Centre for Digestive and Gut Health, Imperial College London, London, SW7 2AZ, United Kingdom.
5
Division of Computational and Systems Medicine, Department of Surgery and Cancer, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, SW7 2AZ, London, United Kingdom.
6
Division of Infection and Immunity, Henry Wellcome Building, Cardiff University, Cardiff, CF14 4XN, United Kingdom.

Abstract

Hypercholesterolaemia is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and it has been found that some probiotic bacteria possess cholesterol-lowering capabilities. In this study, the ability of the Lab4 probiotic consortium to hydrolyse bile salts, assimilate cholesterol and regulate cholesterol transport by polarised Caco-2 enterocytes was demonstrated. Furthermore, in wild-type C57BL/6J mice fed a high fat diet, 2-weeks supplementation with Lab4 probiotic consortium plus Lactobacillus plantarum CUL66 resulted in significant reductions in plasma total cholesterol levels and suppression of diet-induced weight gain. No changes in plasma levels of very low-density lipoprotein/low-density lipoprotein, high-density lipoprotein, triglycerides, cytokines or bile acids were observed. Increased amounts of total and unconjugated bile acids in the faeces of the probiotic-fed mice, together with modulation of hepatic small heterodimer partner and cholesterol-7α-hydroxylase mRNA expression, implicates bile salt hydrolase activity as a potential mechanism of action. In summary, this study demonstrates the cholesterol-lowering efficacy of short-term feeding of the Lab4 probiotic consortium plus L. plantarum CUL66 in wild-type mice and supports further assessment in human trials.

PMID:
28588193
PMCID:
PMC5460276
DOI:
10.1038/s41598-017-02889-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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