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Cancer Chemother Pharmacol. 2017 Jul;80(1):135-149. doi: 10.1007/s00280-017-3344-3. Epub 2017 Jun 5.

UGT1A1*6 polymorphisms are correlated with irinotecan-induced neutropenia: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmacy, Third Affiliated Hospital to Kunming Medical University, Tumor Hospital of Yunnan Province, Kunming, 650118, Yunnan, People's Republic of China.
2
Department of Pathology, College of Basic Medicine, Dali University, Dali, 671000, People's Republic of China.
3
Department of Pharmacy, Third Affiliated Hospital to Kunming Medical University, Tumor Hospital of Yunnan Province, Kunming, 650118, Yunnan, People's Republic of China. chenxuemeikmyxy@163.com.

Abstract

Irinotecan (IRI) chemotherapy toxicities can be severe, and may result in treatment delay, morbidity and in some rare cases death. Neutropenia is a life-threatening side effect of irinotecan, and UDP glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) gene polymorphisms could predict the side effects in cancer patients and then reduce IRI-induced toxicity by preventative treatment or a decrease in dose. Both UGT1A1*6 and *28 were reliably demonstrated to be risk factors for IRI-induced neutropenia, with tests for both polymorphisms potentially being particularly useful in Asian cancer patients. However, some researchers reported that UGT1A1*6 could predict IRI-induced toxicities in Asian populations, controversial conclusions still remained. Thus, the association between UGT1A1*6 polymorphisms and IRI-induced severe toxicity in cancer patients is still needed to be explored. Therefore, this study aims to investigate the association between UGT1A1*6 polymorphisms and IRI-related severe neutropenia in cancer patients on a large scale. A total of 12 studies that included 746 wild genotype (G/G) cases and 394 variant genotype (G/A and A/A) cases were included on the basis of inclusion criteria. Then we assessed the methodologies quality; odds ratio (OR), risk difference (RD) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were used to assess the strength of association. Overall, an increased risk of severe neutropenia in cancer patients with UGT1A1*6 polymorphisms was found. Patients with recessive models (GA + AA vs. GG) of UGT1A1*6 showed an increased risk (OR 2.03, 95% CI 1.54-2.68; RD = 0.11, P < 0.001). Specifically, the heterozygous variant of UGT1A1*6 showed an increased risk (OR 1.83, 95% CI 1.36-2.46; RD = 0.09, P < 0.001), and homozygous mutation showed also high risk (OR 2.95, 95% CI 1.83-4.75; RD = 0.18, P < 0.001) for severe neutropenia. Subgroup meta-analysis revealed that for patients harboring both heterozygous and homozygous variants, cancer types, low dose of IRI and the duration of treatment also presented comparably increased risk in suffering severe neutropenia. As for country, in China and Japan, there was a statistically increased severe neutropenia with variant genotype of UGT1A1*6 (China: GA + AA vs. GG, OR 1.83, 95% CI 1.28-2.59; RD = 0.08, P = 0.001; Japan: GA + AA vs. GG, OR 2.39, 95% CI 1.45-3.92; RD = 0.15, P = 0.001). In conclusion, in this meta-analysis, the UGT1A1*6 polymorphisms were associated with an increased risk of IRI-induced neutropenia in cancer patients, and increased incidences of severe neutropenia could be correlated with diverse regions, cancer type, low dose of IRI and the duration of treatment.

KEYWORDS:

Irinotecan; Meta-analysis; Neutropenia; UGT1A1*6 polymorphisms

PMID:
28585035
DOI:
10.1007/s00280-017-3344-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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