Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci. 2017 Jul 19;372(1725). pii: 20160169. doi: 10.1098/rstb.2016.0169.

Structural drivers of vulnerability to zoonotic disease in Africa.

Author information

1
Centre for Applied Social Sciences, University of Zimbabwe, Harare, Zimbabwe vdzingi@gmail.com.
2
Institute of Anthropology, Gender and African Studies, University of Nairobi, Nairobi, Kenya.
3
Institute of Development Studies, University of Sussex, Brighton BN1 9RE, UK.
4
Centre for Applied Social Sciences, University of Zimbabwe, Harare, Zimbabwe.

Abstract

This paper argues that addressing the underlying structural drivers of disease vulnerability is essential for a 'One Health' approach to tackling zoonotic diseases in Africa. Through three case studies-trypanosomiasis in Zimbabwe, Ebola and Lassa fever in Sierra Leone and Rift Valley fever in Kenya-we show how political interests, commercial investments and conflict and securitization all generate patterns of vulnerability, reshaping the political ecology of disease landscapes, influencing traditional coping mechanisms and affecting health service provision and outbreak responses. A historical, political economy approach reveals patterns of 'structural violence' that reinforce inequalities and marginalization of certain groups, increasing disease risks. Addressing the politics of One Health requires analysing trade-offs and conflicts between interests and visions of the future. For all zoonotic diseases economic and political dimensions are ultimately critical and One Health approaches must engage with these factors, and not just end with an 'anti-political' focus on institutional and disciplinary collaboration.This article is part of the themed issue 'One Health for a changing world: zoonoses, ecosystems and human well-being'.

KEYWORDS:

One Health; political economy; structural violence; zoonotic disease

PMID:
28584177
PMCID:
PMC5468694
DOI:
10.1098/rstb.2016.0169
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center