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Am J Cardiol. 2017 Aug 1;120(3):473-478. doi: 10.1016/j.amjcard.2017.05.004. Epub 2017 May 11.

Relation of Serum Vitamin D to Risk of Mitral Annular and Aortic Valve Calcium (from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis).

Author information

1
Division of Cardiology, Ciccarone Center for the Prevention of Heart Disease, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland.
2
Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland.
3
Division of Nephrology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington.
4
Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York.
5
Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota.
6
Division of Cardiology, Harbor-University of California Los Angeles Medical Center, Los Angeles, California.
7
Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York; Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York; Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York.
8
Division of Cardiology, Ciccarone Center for the Prevention of Heart Disease, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland. Electronic address: edonnell@jhmi.edu.

Abstract

Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentration has been identified as a possible modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). We hypothesized that serum 25(OH)D concentration would be associated with calcifications of the left-sided heart valves, which are markers of CVD risk. Aortic valve calcium (AVC) and mitral annular calcium (MAC) were quantified from cardiac computed tomography scans performed on 5,530 Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis participants at the baseline examination (2000 to 2002) and at a follow-up visit at either Examination 2 (2002 to 2004) or Examination 3 (2004 to 2005). 25(OH)D was measured from serum samples collected at the baseline examination. Using relative risk regression, we evaluated the multivariable-adjusted risk of prevalent and incident AVC and MAC in this ethnically diverse population free of clinical CVD at baseline. The mean age of participants was 62 ± 10 years; 53% were women, 40% white, 26% black, 21% Hispanic, and 12% Chinese. Prevalent AVC and MAC were observed in 12% and 9% of study sample, respectively. There were no significant associations between 25(OH)D and prevalent AVC or MAC. Over a mean follow-up of 2.5 years, 4% developed incident AVC and 5% developed incident MAC. After adjusting for demographic variables, each 10 ng/ml higher serum 25(OH)D was associated with a 15% (relative risk 0.85, 95% confidence interval 0.74 to 0.98) lower risk of incident MAC but not AVC. However, this association was no longer significant after adjusting for lifestyle and CVD risk factors. Results suggest a possible link between serum 25(OH)D and the risk for incident MAC, but future studies with longer follow-up are needed to further test this association.

PMID:
28583687
PMCID:
PMC5523859
DOI:
10.1016/j.amjcard.2017.05.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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