Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Transplant Proc. 2017 Jun;49(5):1082-1086. doi: 10.1016/j.transproceed.2017.03.032.

Prediction of Fluid Responsiveness by a Non-invasive Respiratory Systolic Time Interval Variation Using Heart Sound Signals in Recipients Undergoing Liver Transplantation.

Author information

1
Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
2
Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. Electronic address: kshwang@amc.seoul.kr.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The fluid management of cirrhotic patients undergoing liver transplantation (LT) is challenging. Phonocardiography, a graphic recording of heart sounds, provides valuable information concerning heart function and hemodynamic condition. We assessed whether the systolic time interval (STI) and its respiratory variation could predict fluid responsiveness in cirrhotic patients undergoing LT.

METHODS:

Thirty LT recipients who needed volume expansion were included. The fluid challenge consisted of 500 mL 5% albumin administered over a period of 10 minutes. STI was measured as the time interval between the maximal amplitude of each heart sound corrected with the corresponding RR interval (cSTI). The respiratory variation in STI (STV) induced by mechanical ventilation was calculated. Responders were defined as those showing a ≥10% increase in stroke volume index after volume expansion.

RESULTS:

In all, 14 of the 30 patients were responders. Significant increases in cSTI were observed after volume expansion in both responders (P < .001) and non-responders (P = .008). Responders showed significant decreases in STV (11.1% ± 4.3% vs 6.1% ± 2.6%, P < .001) after fluid loading, whereas STV in non-responders remained unchanged (6.4% ± 2.6% vs 6.4% ± 4.2%, P = .86). A cut-off value of ≥7.5% STV from baseline could predict fluid responsiveness with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.804 (95% confidence interval, 0.618-0.925).

CONCLUSIONS:

Intra-operative STV can predict fluid responsiveness in patients undergoing LT. Beat-to-beat monitoring of STI and STV may be useful as a non-invasive hemodynamic index and for fluid management.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center