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J Environ Manage. 2017 Sep 15;200:229-242. doi: 10.1016/j.jenvman.2017.05.085. Epub 2017 Jun 3.

Development of lightweight aggregates from stone cutting sludge, plastic wastes and sepiolite rejections for agricultural and environmental purposes.

Author information

1
University of Castilla-La Mancha, Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Environmental Sciences and Biochemistry, Avenida Carlos III, s/n, 45071, Toledo, Spain. Electronic address: josemanuel.moreno@uclm.es.
2
University of Castilla-La Mancha, Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Environmental Sciences and Biochemistry, Avenida Carlos III, s/n, 45071, Toledo, Spain. Electronic address: beatriz.gcorrochano@uclm.es.
3
University of Castilla-La Mancha, Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Environmental Sciences and Biochemistry, Avenida Carlos III, s/n, 45071, Toledo, Spain. Electronic address: jacinto.alonso@uclm.es.
4
University of Castilla-La Mancha, Department of Chemical Engineering, School of Civil Engineering, Av. Camilo José Cela, 2, 13071, Ciudad Real, Spain. Electronic address: luis.rromero@uclm.es.
5
University of Castilla-La Mancha, Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical Sciences and Technology, Av. Camilo José Cela, s/n, 13071, Ciudad Real, Spain. Electronic address: anselmo.acosta@uclm.es.

Abstract

Three different wastes have been assessed for lightweight aggregate (LWA) manufacturing: granite and marble sludge (COR), sepiolite rejections (SEP) and polyethylene-hexene thermoplastics (P). A preliminary study of the physical and chemical properties of the raw materials was carried out to design proper batches. It was mixed 10% SEP with 90% COR to confer plasticity, and in turn, 0, 2.5, 5 and 10% (w/w) of P was added to check its suitability as a bloating agent. The mixtures were milled, kneaded with water, extruded, shaped into pellets, oven-dried and finally fired at 1100, 1125 and 1150 °C for 4, 8 and 16 min. The main technological properties of the aggregates related to bloating, density, porosity, loss on ignition, water absorption and compressive strength were measured. Scanning Electron Microscopy was used to study the microstructure of some LWAs. 23 out of 29 types of aggregate were lightweight, although neither bloating effect was observed, nor the typical cellular structure comprised of shell and core with relatively large pores was obtained, but a structure consisting of micropores and microchannels. The increase of temperature and time of firing involved a greater sintering, which in turn was translated into higher shrinkage, density and compressive strength values, but less porosity and water absorption. The addition of P did not involve any improvement, indeed it caused a significant decrease in compressive strength. The LWA sintered without P at the minimum time (4 min) and temperature of firing (1100 °C) was selected to assess its water suction capability. The results pointed out that this LWA could be suitable in hydroponics and/or water filtration systems, even better than the commercial LWA Arlita G3. A new and most environment-friendly perspective in LWA industry arises from here, promoting LWA production at relative low temperatures (prior to significant sintering occurs) and using non-plastic silty wastes instead of clays as major components.

KEYWORDS:

Hydroponics; Lightweight aggregate; Ornamental rock; Sepiolite; Waste recycling; Water filtration

PMID:
28582746
DOI:
10.1016/j.jenvman.2017.05.085
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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