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Gastroenterology. 2017 Sep;153(3):681-688.e2. doi: 10.1053/j.gastro.2017.05.044. Epub 2017 Jun 1.

Late Recurrence of Barrett's Esophagus After Complete Eradication of Intestinal Metaplasia is Rare: Final Report From Ablation in Intestinal Metaplasia Containing Dysplasia Trial.

Author information

1
From the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Center for Esophageal Diseases and Swallowing, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.
2
Gastrointestinal Associates, Knoxville, Tennessee.
3
Division of Digestive and Liver Diseases, Columbia University, New York, New York.
4
Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida.
5
Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota.
6
From the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Center for Esophageal Diseases and Swallowing, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Electronic address: Nicholas_shaheen@med.unc.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS:

The goal of treatment for Barrett's esophagus (BE) with dysplasia is complete eradication of intestinal metaplasia (CEIM). The long-term durability of CEIM has not been well characterized, so the frequency and duration of surveillance are unclear. We report results from a 5-year follow-up analysis of patients with BE and dysplasia treated by radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in the randomized controlled Ablation of Intestinal Metaplasia Containing Dysplasia (AIM) trial.

METHODS:

Participants for the AIM Dysplasia trial (18-80 years old) were recruited from 19 sites in the United States and had endoscopic evidence of non-nodular dysplastic BE ≤8 cm in length. Subjects (n = 127) were randomly assigned (2:1 ratio) to receive either RFA (entire BE segment ablated circumferentially) or a sham endoscopic procedure; patients in the sham group were offered RFA treatment 1 year later, and all patients were followed for 5 years. We collected data on BE recurrence (defined as intestinal metaplasia in the tubular esophagus) and dysplastic BE recurrence among patients who achieved CEIM. We constructed Kaplan-Meier estimates and applied parametric survival analysis to examine proportions of patients without any recurrence and without dysplastic recurrence.

RESULTS:

Of 127 patients in the AIM Dysplasia trial, 119 received RFA and met inclusion criteria. Of those 119, 110 (92%) achieved CEIM. Over 401 person-years of follow-up (mean, 3.6 years per patient; range, 0.2-5.8 years), 35 of 110 (32%) patients had recurrence of BE or dysplasia, and 19 (17%) had dysplasia recurrence. The incidence rate of BE recurrence was 10.8 per 100 person-years overall (95% CI, 7.8-15.0); 8.3 per 100 person-years among patients with baseline low-grade dysplasia (95% CI, 4.9-14.0), and 13.5 per 100 person-years among patients with baseline high-grade dysplasia (95% CI 8.8-20.7). The incidence rate of dysplasia recurrence was 5.2 per 100 person-years overall (95% CI 3.3-8.2); 3.3 per 100 person-years among patients with baseline low-grade dysplasia (95% CI 1.5-7.2), and 7.3 per 100 person-years among patients with baseline high-grade dysplasia (95% CI 4.2-12.5). Neither BE nor dysplasia recurred at a constant rate. There was a greater probability of recurrence in the first year following CEIM than in the following 4 years combined.

CONCLUSIONS:

In this analysis of prospective cohort data from the AIM Dysplasia trial, we found BE to recur after CEIM by RFA in almost one third of patients with baseline dysplastic disease; most recurrences occurred during the first year after CEIM. However, patients who achieved CEIM and remained BE free at 1 year after RFA had a low risk of BE recurrence. Studies are needed to determine when surveillance can be decreased or discontinued; our study did not identify any BE or dysplasia recurrence after 4 years of surveillance.

KEYWORDS:

HGD; High Grade Dysplasia; LGD; Long-term Outcome; Low Grade Dysplasia; Prognostic Factor

PMID:
28579538
PMCID:
PMC5581683
DOI:
10.1053/j.gastro.2017.05.044
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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