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Int J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2017 Nov;46(11):1380-1386. doi: 10.1016/j.ijom.2017.05.004. Epub 2017 Jun 1.

A longitudinal study of changes in psychosocial well-being during orthognathic treatment.

Author information

1
Faculty of Social Sciences (Psychology), University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland; Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Diseases, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
2
Faculty of Social Sciences (Psychology), University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
3
Faculty of Medicine and Life Sciences, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland; Oral and Maxillofacial Unit, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland.
4
Department of Community Dentistry, Institute of Dentistry, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
5
Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Diseases, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
6
Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Diseases, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland; Department of Oral Development and Orthodontics, Institute of Dentistry, University of Turku, Turku, Finland. Electronic address: anlisve@utu.fi.

Abstract

The aim was to evaluate changes in the psychosocial well-being of orthognathic surgery patients (n=22) during treatment and to compare results with those of adults not requiring orthognathic treatment (n=22). Patient data were collected before treatment (T0), after the first orthodontic examination (T1), three times during treatment (T2-T4), and 1 year after surgery (T5). In this article, only data corresponding to patient stage T5 are reported for the control subjects. Participants filled in a structured diary and the modified version of the Secord and Jourard body image questionnaire, the Orthognathic Quality of Life Questionnaire, the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, and the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire II. Moreover, patients filled in the Symptom Checklist-90. After the placement of orthodontic appliances (T2), orthognathic quality of life, self-esteem, and psychological flexibility were lower and psychiatric symptoms increased. Improvements were observed from T2 to T5 in orthognathic quality of life, body image, self-esteem, psychological flexibility, and psychiatric symptoms. Treatment resulted in improvements from T0 to T5 in orthognathic quality of life, body image, and psychiatric symptoms. At T5, patient psychosocial well-being was comparable to or even better than that of control subjects. Orthognathic treatment seems to support psychological well-being, but the range of individual variation is wide.

KEYWORDS:

orthognathic; psychosocial; quality of life; well-being

PMID:
28579266
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijom.2017.05.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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