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Child Adolesc Psychiatr Clin N Am. 2017 Jul;26(3):571-586. doi: 10.1016/j.chc.2017.02.011.

Feeding Disorders.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, C.S. Mott Children's Hospital, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
2
Department of Pediatrics, C.S. Mott Children's Hospital, University of Michigan Medical School, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, SPC 5718, D2240 MPB, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-5318, USA.
3
Department of Pediatrics, C.S. Mott Children's Hospital, University of Michigan Medical School, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, MPB D2214, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-5318, USA.
4
Department of Speech-Language Pathology, C.S. Mott Children's Hospital, University of Michigan, 1540 East Hospital Drive, C&W 12-658, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA.
5
Department of Pediatrics, C.S. Mott Children's Hospital, University of Michigan Medical School, D2232 MPB, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, SPC 5718, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-5718, USA. Electronic address: adrayton@med.umich.edu.

Abstract

Feeding disorders often present in children with complex medical histories as well as those with neurodevelopmental disabilities. If untreated, feeding problems will likely persist and may lead to additional developmental and medical complications. Treatment of pediatric feeding disorders should involve an interdisciplinary team, but the core intervention should include behavioral feeding techniques as they are the only empirically supported therapy for feeding disorders.

KEYWORDS:

Behavioral intervention; Evidence-based treatment; Feeding disorders; Interdisciplinary; Pediatrics

PMID:
28577610
DOI:
10.1016/j.chc.2017.02.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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