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Neurosci Biobehav Rev. 2017 Sep;80:276-285. doi: 10.1016/j.neubiorev.2017.03.019. Epub 2017 May 30.

The role of the habenula in the transition from reward to misery in substance use and mood disorders.

Author information

1
Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Psychiatry, Reinier Postlaan 10, 6500 HB, Nijmegen, The Netherlands; Radboud University, Nijmegen Institute for Scientist-Practitioners in Addiction, Toernooiveld 5, 6525 ED, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Electronic address: abatallacases@gmail.com.
2
Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Cognitive Neuroscience, PO Box 9101, 6500 HB, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Electronic address: judith.homberg@radboudumc.nl.
3
Federal State Budgetary Scientific Institution, Scientific Research Institute of Physiology and Basic Medicine, Timakova 4, 630117, Novosibirsk, Russia; Novosibirsk State University, Pirogova 2, 630090, Novosibirsk, Russia. Electronic address: lipina@physiol.ru.
4
Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University, Kapittelweg 29, 6525 EN, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Electronic address: g.sescousse@fcdonders.ru.nl.
5
Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University, Montessorilaan 3, 6525 HR, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Electronic address: m.luijten@pwo.ru.nl.
6
Mental Health Research Institute, Tomsk National Research Medical Center of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Aleutskaya street 4, 634014, Tomsk, Russian Federation; National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenin Avenue, 30, 634050, Tomsk, Russian Federation. Electronic address: svetlana@mail.tomsknet.ru.
7
Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Psychiatry, Reinier Postlaan 10, 6500 HB, Nijmegen, The Netherlands; Radboud University, Nijmegen Institute for Scientist-Practitioners in Addiction, Toernooiveld 5, 6525 ED, Nijmegen, The Netherlands; Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University, Kapittelweg 29, 6525 EN, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Electronic address: arnt.schellekens@radboudumc.nl.
8
Groningen Research Institute of Pharmacy, University of Groningen, Antonius Deusinglaan 1, 9713AV, Groningen, The Netherlands; GGZ Westelijk Noord-Brabant, Hoofdlaan 8, 4661AA, Halsteren, The Netherlands. Electronic address: a.j.m.loonen@rug.nl.

Abstract

The habenula (Hb) is an evolutionary well-conserved structure located in the epithalamus. The Hb receives inputs from the septum, basal ganglia, hypothalamus, anterior cingulate and medial prefrontal cortex, and projects to several midbrain centers, most importantly the inhibitory rostromedial tegmental nucleus (RMTg) and the excitatory interpeduncular nucleus (IPN), which regulate the activity of midbrain monoaminergic nuclei. The Hb is postulated to play a key role in reward and aversion processing across species, including humans, and to be implicated in the different stages of transition from recreational drug intake to addiction and co-morbid mood disorders. The Hb is divided into two anatomically and functionally distinct nuclei, the lateral (LHb) and the medial (MHb), which are primarily involved in reward-seeking (LHb) and misery-fleeing (MHb) behavior by controlling the RMTg and IPN, respectively. This review provides a neuroanatomical description of the Hb, discusses preclinical and human findings regarding its role in the development of addiction and co-morbid mood disorders, and addresses future directions in this area.

KEYWORDS:

Habenula; Mood disorders; Reward; Substance use disorders; fmri

PMID:
28576510
DOI:
10.1016/j.neubiorev.2017.03.019
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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