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BMC Womens Health. 2017 Jun 2;17(1):40. doi: 10.1186/s12905-017-0394-y.

Cervical cancer risk perceptions, sexual risk behaviors and sexually transmitted infections among Bivalent Human Papillomavirus vaccinated and non-vaccinated young women in Uganda - 5 year follow up study.

Author information

1
School of Biomedical Sciences, College of Health Sciences, Makerere University, P.O. Box 7072, Kampala, Uganda. kumakeche@yahoo.com.
2
School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, 701 82, Örebro, Sweden. kumakeche@yahoo.com.
3
School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, 701 82, Örebro, Sweden.
4
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, 703 62, Örebro, Sweden.
5
Department of Pathology, Kampala Cancer Registry, Makerere University, P.O. Box 7072, Kampala, Uganda.
6
Department of Medical Microbiology, Immunology Laboratory, Makerere University, P.O. Box 7072, Kampala, Uganda.
7
Department of Medical Microbiology, Immunology laboratory, Makerere University, P.O. Box 7072, Kampala, Uganda.
8
Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, 221 00, Lund, Sweden.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Previous studies were conflicting regarding the associations between HPV vaccination, cervical cancer risk perceptions, high-risk sexual behaviors and STIs. This study compared the HPV-vaccinated and non-vaccinated young women in Uganda regarding cervical cancer risk perceptions, high-risk sexual behaviors, syphilis and HIV infections 5 years after vaccine implementation.

METHODS:

This was a population-based comparative cross-sectional survey conducted in Uganda. The 438 participants were sexually active young women aged 15-24 years and mean age was 18.6 (SD 1.4). The majority (53.0%) were HPV-vaccinated in 2008 without assessment of sexual activity prior to HPV vaccination. Upon verbal assessment of sexual activity at the time of follow-up, data were collected using a questionnaire and laboratory testing of blood samples for syphilis and HIV infections.

RESULTS:

There were no significant differences between the HPV-vaccinated and non-vaccinated groups regarding the prevalence of high-risk sexual behaviors, syphilis and HIV infections. Cervical cancer risk perceptions and age at sexual debut were nonetheless significantly lower among the vaccinated group compared to their non-vaccinated counterparts. However, HPV vaccination was not significantly associated to cervical cancer risk perceptions and early age at sexual debut in multivariate logistic regression analysis.

CONCLUSIONS:

We found no associations between HPV vaccination, cervical cancer risk perceptions, high-risk sexual behaviors, syphilis and HIV infections among young women in Uganda 5 years after vaccine implementation. Young girls in the study population were found to be sexually active at a young age, affirming the importance of targeting girls of younger age for HPV vaccination.

KEYWORDS:

Bivalent Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination; Sexually transmitted infections; Uganda; Young women; cervical cancer risk perceptions; sexual risk behaviors

PMID:
28576143
PMCID:
PMC5457617
DOI:
10.1186/s12905-017-0394-y
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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