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Methods Mol Biol. 2017;1628:259-270. doi: 10.1007/978-1-4939-7116-9_21.

Visualizing Ebolavirus Particles Using Single-Particle Interferometric Reflectance Imaging Sensor (SP-IRIS).

Author information

1
Microbiology and National Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratories, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA.
2
Biomedical Engineering Department, Boston University, Boston, MA, USA.
3
Mechanical Engineering Department, Boston University, Boston, MA, USA.
4
Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Boston University, Boston, MA, USA.
5
NanoView Diagnostics Inc., Boston, MA, USA.
6
Photonics Center, Boston University, Boston, MA, USA.
7
Microbiology and National Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratories, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA. jhconnor@bu.edu.
8
Biomedical Engineering Department, Boston University, Boston, MA, USA. jhconnor@bu.edu.

Abstract

This chapter describes an approach for the label-free imaging and quantification of intact Ebola virus (EBOV) and EBOV viruslike particles (VLPs) using a light microscopy technique. In this technique, individual virus particles are captured onto a silicon chip that has been printed with spots of virus-specific capture antibodies. These captured virions are then detected using an optical approach called interference reflectance imaging. This approach allows for the detection of each virus particle that is captured on an antibody spot and can resolve the filamentous structure of EBOV VLPs without the need for electron microscopy. Capture of VLPs and virions can be done from a variety of sample types ranging from tissue culture medium to blood. The technique also allows automated quantitative analysis of the number of virions captured. This can be used to identify the virus concentration in an unknown sample. In addition, this technique offers the opportunity to easily image virions captured from native solutions without the need for additional labeling approaches while offering a means of assessing the range of particle sizes and morphologies in a quantitative manner.

KEYWORDS:

Biosensing; Ebola; High throughput; Interferometric imaging; Label-free; Viral hemorrhagic fevers; Virus detection

PMID:
28573627
DOI:
10.1007/978-1-4939-7116-9_21
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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