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J Dent Educ. 2017 Jun;81(6):744-751. doi: 10.21815/JDE.017.015.

Do Dental Students' Personality Types and Group Dynamics Affect Their Performance in Problem-Based Learning?

Author information

1
Dr. Ihm is Lecturer, Office of Dental Education, School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Republic of Korea; Dr. An is Associate Professor, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Wonkwang University, Republic of Korea; and Dr. Seo is Associate Professor, Department of Conservative Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Republic of Korea.
2
Dr. Ihm is Lecturer, Office of Dental Education, School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Republic of Korea; Dr. An is Associate Professor, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Wonkwang University, Republic of Korea; and Dr. Seo is Associate Professor, Department of Conservative Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Republic of Korea. dgseo@snu.ac.kr.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to determine whether the personality types of dental students and their group dynamics were linked to their problem-based learning (PBL) performance. The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) instrument was used with 263 dental students enrolled in Seoul National University School of Dentistry from 2011 to 2013; the students had participated in PBL in their first year. A four-session PBL setting was designed to analyze how individual personality types and the diversity of their small groups were associated with PBL performance. Overall, the results showed that the personality type of PBL performance that was the most prominent was Judging. As a group became more diverse with its different constituent personality characteristics, there was a tendency for the group to be higher ranked in terms of PBL performance. In particular, the overperforming group was clustered around three major profiles: Extraverted Intuitive Thinking Judging (ENTJ), Introverted Sensing Thinking Judging (ISTJ), and Extraverted Sensing Thinking Judging (ESTJ). Personality analysis would be beneficial for dental faculty members in order for them to understand the extent to which cooperative learning would work smoothly, especially when considering group personalities.

KEYWORDS:

dental education; educational methodology; group dynamics; personality types; problem-based learning

PMID:
28572421
DOI:
10.21815/JDE.017.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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