Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Evolution. 1992 Jun;46(3):616-626. doi: 10.1111/j.1558-5646.1992.tb02070.x.

THE MEASUREMENT OF SELECTION ON QUANTITATIVE TRAITS: BIASES DUE TO ENVIRONMENTAL COVARIANCES BETWEEN TRAITS AND FITNESS.

Author information

1
Department of Zoology, Duke University, Durham, NC, 27706, USA.

Abstract

The use of regression techniques for estimating the direction and magnitude of selection from measurements on phenotypes has become widespread in field studies. A potential problem with these techniques is that environmental correlations between fitness and the traits examined may produce biased estimates of selection gradients. This report demonstrates that the phenotypic covariance between fitness and a trait, used as an estimate of the selection differential in estimating selection gradients, has two components: a component induced by selection itself and a component due to the effect of environmental factors on fitness. The second component is shown to be responsible for biases in estimates of selection gradients. The use of regressions involving genotypic and breeding values instead of phenotypic values can yield estimates of selection gradients that are not biased by environmental covariances. Statistical methods for estimating the coefficients of such regressions, and for testing for biases in regressions involving phenotypic values, are described.

KEYWORDS:

Biased estimates; environmental covariance; fitness; quantitative traits; selection gradients

Supplemental Content

Loading ...
Support Center