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Pediatrics. 2017 May;139(5). pii: e20162883. doi: 10.1542/peds.2016-2883. Epub 2017 Apr 17.

The Concordance of Parent and Child Immunization.

Author information

1
Oregon Immunization Program, Oregon Health Division, Portland, Oregon steve.g.robison@state.or.us.
2
Oregon Immunization Program, Oregon Health Division, Portland, Oregon.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

A substantial body of work has related survey-based parental vaccine hesitancy to noncompliant childhood immunization. However little attention has been paid to the connection between parents' own immunization behavior and the immunizations their children receive.

METHODS:

Using the Oregon ALERT Immunization Information System, we identified adult caregiver-child pairs for children between 9 months and 17 years of age. The likelihood of adult-child concordance of influenza immunization per influenza season from 2010-2011 through 2014-2015 was assessed. The utility of adult immunization as a predictor was also assessed for other, noninfluenza recommended immunizations for children and adolescents.

RESULTS:

A total of 450 687 matched adult caregiver-child pairs were included in the study. The children of immunizing adults were 2.77 times more likely to also be immunized for seasonal influenza across all seasons (95% confidence interval, 2.74-2.79), with similar results applying within each season. Adult immunization status was also significantly associated with the likelihood of children and adolescents getting other noninfluenza immunizations, such as the human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV). When adults improved their own behavior from nonimmunizing to immunizing across influenza seasons, their children if not immunized in the previous season were 5.44 times (95% confidence interval, 5.35-5.53) more likely to become immunized for influenza.

CONCLUSIONS:

Children's likelihood of following immunization recommendations is associated with the immunization behavior of their parents. Encouraging parental immunization is a potential tool for increasing children's immunization rates.

PMID:
28557731
DOI:
10.1542/peds.2016-2883
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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