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Acta Ophthalmol. 2018 Mar;96(2):e189-e194. doi: 10.1111/aos.13482. Epub 2017 May 27.

Impact of postoperative positioning on the outcome of pars plana vitrectomy with gas tamponade for primary rhegmatogenous retinal detachment: comparison between supine and prone positioning.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery-related, Division of Ophthalmology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Japan.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To compare the postoperative anatomic success rates and the frequency of complications between prone or supine postoperative positioning after transconjunctival sutureless vitrectomy (TSV) for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD).

METHODS:

All patients underwent primary 27-gauge TSV for the treatment of primary RRD. Patients were divided into two groups as follows: group A was patients instructed to keep strict postoperative prone positioning for a minimum of 8 days. Group B was patients instructed to keep the prone positioning on the day of the surgery followed by supine positioning for minimum of 7 days from the day after surgery.

RESULT:

Sixty-two eyes were enrolled (group A: 32, group B: 30). There was no significant difference in baseline data between two groups. The initial and final anatomical success rates were 93.8% and 100% in group A and 93.3% and 100% in group B, respectively (p = 1, p = 1, respectively). Posterior synechia of the iris occurred in one eye in group A and in two eyes in group B (p = 0.61). Macular pucker and retinal fold did not occur in either group. Preoperative intraocular pressure (IOP; mmHg) was 14.5 ± 2.9 in group A and 14.5 ± 2.6 in group B (p = 0.92). Intraocular pressure (IOP) was not statistically different between the groups during the follow-up period (p = 0.36, p = 0.07, respectively).

CONCLUSION:

Supine positioning may be an option as a postoperative positioning after TSV and gas tamponade for the treatment of RRD.

KEYWORDS:

postoperative positioning; prone positioning; retinal detachment; supine positioning

PMID:
28556420
DOI:
10.1111/aos.13482
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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