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Nat Commun. 2017 May 30;8:15563. doi: 10.1038/ncomms15563.

Central and peripheral clocks are coupled by a neuropeptide pathway in Drosophila.

Author information

1
Neurobiology and Genetics, Theodor-Boveri-Institute, Biocenter, University of Würzburg, Am Hubland, 97074 Würzburg, Germany.
2
Centro Interdisciplinario de Neurociencia de Valparaíso, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valparaiso, Gran Bretaña 1111, Valparaiso 2360102, Chile.

Abstract

Animal circadian clocks consist of central and peripheral pacemakers, which are coordinated to produce daily rhythms in physiology and behaviour. Despite its importance for optimal performance and health, the mechanism of clock coordination is poorly understood. Here we dissect the pathway through which the circadian clock of Drosophila imposes daily rhythmicity to the pattern of adult emergence. Rhythmicity depends on the coupling between the brain clock and a peripheral clock in the prothoracic gland (PG), which produces the steroid hormone, ecdysone. Time information from the central clock is transmitted via the neuropeptide, sNPF, to non-clock neurons that produce the neuropeptide, PTTH. These secretory neurons then forward time information to the PG clock. We also show that the central clock exerts a dominant role on the peripheral clock. This use of two coupled clocks could serve as a paradigm to understand how daily steroid hormone rhythms are generated in animals.

PMID:
28555616
PMCID:
PMC5459987
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms15563
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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