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Trends Neurosci. 2017 Jul;40(7):385-396. doi: 10.1016/j.tins.2017.04.005. Epub 2017 May 26.

Endocannabinoid Signaling in the Control of Social Behavior.

Author information

1
Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of California, Irvine, CA, USA; School of Medicine, University of California, Irvine, CA, USA.
2
Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Picower Institute for Learning and Memory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA; Harvard Medical School, Harvard University, Boston, MA, USA.
3
Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Picower Institute for Learning and Memory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA.
4
Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of California, Irvine, CA, USA; School of Medicine, University of California, Irvine, CA, USA. Electronic address: piomelli@uci.edu.

Abstract

Many mammalian species, including humans, exhibit social behavior and form complex social groups. Mechanistic studies in animal models have revealed important roles for the endocannabinoid signaling system, comprising G protein-coupled cannabinoid receptors and their endogenous lipid-derived agonists, in the control of neural processes that underpin social anxiety and social reward, two key aspects of social behavior. An emergent insight from these studies is that endocannabinoid signaling in specific circuits of the brain is context dependent and selectively recruited. These insights open new vistas on the neural basis of social behavior and social impairment.

KEYWORDS:

2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycerol; anandamide; autism spectrum disorder; schizophrenia; social anxiety; social reward

PMID:
28554687
PMCID:
PMC5699224
DOI:
10.1016/j.tins.2017.04.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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