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Prog Brain Res. 2017;231:191-223. doi: 10.1016/bs.pbr.2017.01.001. Epub 2017 Mar 21.

Pluripotent stem cells and their utility in treating photoreceptor degenerations.

Author information

1
UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, London, United Kingdom. Electronic address: nozie.aghaizu.11@ucl.ac.uk.
2
UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, London, United Kingdom.
3
UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, London, United Kingdom. Electronic address: rachael.pearson@ucl.ac.uk.

Abstract

Age-related macular degeneration and inherited retinal degenerations represent the leading causes of blindness in industrialized countries. Despite different initiating causes, they share a common final pathophysiology, the loss of the light sensitive photoreceptors. Replacement by transplantation may offer a potential treatment strategy for both patient populations. The last decade has seen remarkable progress in our ability to generate retinal cell types, including photoreceptors, from a variety of murine and human pluripotent stem cell sources. Driven in large part by the requirement for renewable cell sources, stem cells have emerged not only as a promising source of replacement photoreceptors but also to provide in vitro systems with which to study retinal development and disease processes and to test therapeutic agents.

KEYWORDS:

Blindness; Cones; Embryonic stem cells; Induced pluripotential stem cells; Photoreceptor cells; Retina; Retinal dystrophies; Stem cells; Transplantation

PMID:
28554397
DOI:
10.1016/bs.pbr.2017.01.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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