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Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2017 Sep;72:52-58. doi: 10.1016/j.archger.2017.05.002. Epub 2017 May 17.

Struggling to maintain individuality - Describing the experience of food in nursing homes for people with dementia.

Author information

1
Rehabilitation, Aged and Extended Care, Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia; NHMRC Cognitive Decline Partnership Centre, Sydney, Australia. Electronic address: Rachel.milte@flinders.edu.au.
2
Rehabilitation, Aged and Extended Care, Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia; NHMRC Cognitive Decline Partnership Centre, Sydney, Australia. Electronic address: Wendy.shulver@flinders.edu.au.
3
Rehabilitation, Aged and Extended Care, Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia. Electronic address: Maggie.killington@flinders.edu.au.
4
Rehabilitation, Aged and Extended Care, Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia; NHMRC Cognitive Decline Partnership Centre, Sydney, Australia. Electronic address: Clare.bradley@flinders.edu.au.
5
Nutrition and Dietetics, Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia. Electronic address: Michelle.miller@flinders.edu.au.
6
Rehabilitation, Aged and Extended Care, Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia; NHMRC Cognitive Decline Partnership Centre, Sydney, Australia. Electronic address: Maria.crotty@flinders.edu.au.

Abstract

PURPOSE OF THE STUDY:

To describe the food and dining experience of people with cognitive impairment and their family members in nursing homes.

DESIGN AND METHODS:

Interviews and focus groups with people with cognitive impairment and their family members (n=19). Thematic analysis was undertaken using NVivo10 data analysis software package to determine key themes.

RESULTS:

The main themes identified tracked a journey for people with cognitive impairment in nursing homes, where they initially sought to have their individual needs and preferences recognised and heard, expressed frustration as they perceived growing barriers to receiving dietary care which met their preferences, and ultimately described a deterioration of the amount of control and choice available to the individual with loss of self-feeding ability and dysphagia.

IMPLICATIONS:

Further consideration of how to incorporate individualised dietary care is needed to fully implement person-centred care and support the quality of life of those receiving nursing home care.

KEYWORDS:

Dementia; Long-term care; Nutrition and feeding issues; Qualitative research; Quality of care

PMID:
28552702
DOI:
10.1016/j.archger.2017.05.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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