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Blood Cells Mol Dis. 2017 Jun;65:56-59. doi: 10.1016/j.bcmd.2017.05.006. Epub 2017 May 11.

Exacerbated in vivo metabolic changes suggestive of a spontaneous muscular vaso-occlusive crisis in exercising muscle of a sickle cell mouse.

Author information

1
Aix-Marseille Univ, CNRS, CRMBM, Marseille, France. Electronic address: benjamin.chatel@live.fr.
2
Aix-Marseille Univ, CNRS, CRMBM, Marseille, France; Université Savoie Mont Blanc, Laboratoire Interuniversitaire de Biologie de la Motricité, EA 7424, F-73000 Chambéry, France.
3
Aix-Marseille Univ, CNRS, CRMBM, Marseille, France.

Abstract

While sickle cell disease (SCD) is characterized by frequent vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC), no direct observation of such an event in skeletal muscle has been performed in vivo. The present study reported exacerbated in vivo metabolic changes suggestive of a spontaneous muscular VOC in exercising muscle of a sickle cell mouse. Using magnetic resonance spectroscopy of phosphorus 31, phosphocreatine and inorganic phosphate concentrations and intramuscular pH were measured throughout two standardized protocols of rest - exercise - recovery at two different intensities in ten SCD mice. Among these mice, one single mouse presented divergent responses. A statistical analysis (based on confidence intervals) revealed that this single mouse presented slower phosphocreatine resynthesis and inorganic phosphate disappearance during the post-stimulation recovery of one of the protocols, what could suggest an ischemia. This study described, for the first time in a sickle cell mouse in vivo, exacerbated metabolic changes triggered by an exercise session that would be suggestive of a live observation of a muscular VOC. However, no evidence of a direct cause-effect relationship between exercise and VOC has been put forth.

KEYWORDS:

HbS polymerization; Magnetic resonance spectroscopy of phosphorus 31; Physical activity; Red blood cell sickling

PMID:
28552472
DOI:
10.1016/j.bcmd.2017.05.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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