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Auris Nasus Larynx. 2018 Apr;45(2):286-290. doi: 10.1016/j.anl.2017.05.007. Epub 2017 May 25.

Effectiveness of hemostatic gelatin sponge as a packing material after septoplasty: A prospective, randomized, multicenter study.

Author information

1
Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Biomedical Research Institute, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Pusan National University Hospital, Republic of Korea.
2
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Wallace Memorial Baptist Hospital, Republic of Korea.
3
Department of Otolaryngology, Kosin University College of Medicine, Kosin University Gospel Hospital, Republic of Korea.
4
Department of Otolaryngology, Inje University Haeundae Paik Hospital, Republic of Korea.
5
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Busan St. Mary's Medical Center, Busan, Republic of Korea.
6
Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Biomedical Research Institute, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Pusan National University Hospital, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: choks@pusan.ac.kr.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Although hemostatic gelatin sponge is a gelatin-based packing material with a powerful hemostatic effect, there were no studies in regard to its efficacy for packing material after septoplasty. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of hemostatic gelatin sponge nasal packing on patient's subjective symptoms, hemostasis, and wound healing following septoplasty.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS:

Seventy six adult patients with nasal septum deviation requiring septoplasty were included. Following surgery, one nasal cavity was packed with hemostatic gelatin sponge and the other one with polyvinyl acetate. Patients' subjective symptoms while the packing was in situ, hemostatic properties, patients' pain on removal, degree of bleeding on removal of the packing, time for hemostasis after removal, postoperative wound healing, and the cost of the pack were evaluated.

RESULTS:

Both packs were equally effective in the control of postoperative bleeding following septoplasty. However, hemostatic gelatin sponge packing was significantly more comfortable while in situ and less painful on removal of the pack. The polyvinyl acetate packing was associated with significantly more bleeding on removal, therefore much time was needed to control hemorrhage. There was no significant difference in the cost of the pack used and outcome of wound healing.

CONCLUSION:

The use of hemostatic gelatin sponge after septoplasty results in significantly less discomfort and greater patient satisfaction with no adverse reactions when compared with polyvinyl acetate packing. Therefore, hemostatic gelatin sponge may be a useful packing material after septoplasty.

KEYWORDS:

Absorbable; Biocompatible materials; Gelatin sponge; Nose; Pain; Polyvinyl acetate; Postoperative care; Septoplasty

PMID:
28552274
DOI:
10.1016/j.anl.2017.05.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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