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Addict Behav. 2017 Oct;73:209-215. doi: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2017.05.019. Epub 2017 May 22.

Behavioral change in response to a statewide tobacco tax increase and differences across socioeconomic status.

Author information

1
Health Promotion and Chronic Disease Division, Minnesota Department of Health, 85 7th Place E. St. Paul, MN 55101, USA. Electronic address: michael.parks@state.mn.us.
2
Office of Statewide Health Improvement Initiative, Minnesota Department of Health, St. Paul, MN, USA.
3
Department of Research Programs, ClearWay Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA.
4
Division of Intramural Research, National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities, Bethesda, MD, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Tobacco use is a leading behavioral risk factor for morbidity and mortality, and the tobacco epidemic disproportionately affects low-socioeconomic status (SES) populations. Taxation is effective for reducing cigarette use, and it is an effective population-based policy for reducing SES-related tobacco disparities. However, progress in implementing cigarette excise taxes has stalled across the United States, and there is a dearth of research on the full spectrum of behavioral shifts that result from taxes, particularly among low-SES populations. This project documents the impact of Minnesota's $1.75 cigarette tax increase implemented in 2013.

METHODS:

Data come from the 2014 Minnesota Adult Tobacco Survey. Descriptive analyses and Latent Class Analysis (LCA) were used to provide a typology of the tax impact.

RESULTS:

From the LCA, six classes were identified, and 42% of respondents were classified as reporting action-oriented behavioral change related to the tax-8% reported sustained smoking abstinence. We found differential behavior change across levels of SES. Low-SES and medium/high-SES individuals were equally likely to report complete tobacco cessation, but the prevalence of daily smokers who reported action-oriented behavior without sustained cessation was nearly double for low-SES individuals.

CONCLUSIONS:

Smokers report a range of behavioral changes in response to cigarette taxes, with differences across SES. The majority of smokers, and particularly low-SES smokers, report behavioral steps toward quitting or achieving sustained tobacco cessation in response to cigarette taxes. Complementary population-based programs geared toward assisting individuals, especially low-SES individuals, to achieve continuous tobacco cessation could increase the reach and effectiveness of cigarette taxes.

KEYWORDS:

Cigarette excise taxes; Health equity; Stages-of-change perspective; Statewide tobacco taxation; Tobacco-related disparities

PMID:
28551589
PMCID:
PMC5510536
DOI:
10.1016/j.addbeh.2017.05.019
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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