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Trends Pharmacol Sci. 2017 Jul;38(7):592-607. doi: 10.1016/j.tips.2017.04.005. Epub 2017 May 24.

Targeting Free Radicals in Oxidative Stress-Related Human Diseases.

Author information

1
Faculty of Chemical and Food Technology, Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava, 812 37 Bratislava, Slovakia.
2
Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Constantine the Philosopher University, Trieda Andreja Hlinku 1, 949 74 Nitra, Slovakia.
3
School of Economics and Management in Public Administration in Bratislava, Furdekova 16, 851 04 Bratislava, Slovakia.
4
Fresh-Lands Environmental Actions, Caversham, Berkshire RG4 5BE, UK.
5
Faculty of Chemical and Food Technology, Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava, 812 37 Bratislava, Slovakia. Electronic address: marian.valko@stuba.sk.

Abstract

Cancer and Alzheimer's disease (AD) are characterized by (i) opposing biological mechanisms, (ii) an inverse correlation between their incidences, and (iii) oxidative stress being a common denominator of both diseases. Increased formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cancer cells from oncogenic signaling and/or metabolic disturbances leads to upregulation of cellular antioxidant capacity to maintain ROS levels below a toxic threshold. Combining drugs that induce high levels of ROS with compounds that suppress cellular antioxidant capacity by depleting antioxidant systems [glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and thioredoxin (TRX)] and/or targeting glucose metabolism represents a potential anticancer strategy. In AD, free metals and/or Aβ:metal complexes may cause damage to biomolecules in the brain (via Fenton reaction), including DNA. Metal chelation, based on the application of selective metal chelators or metal delivery, may induce neuroprotective signaling and represents a promising therapeutic strategy. This review examines therapeutic strategies based on the modulation of oxidative stress in cancer and AD.

KEYWORDS:

Alzheimer’s disease; ROS; antioxidants; cancer; oxidative stress

PMID:
28551354
DOI:
10.1016/j.tips.2017.04.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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