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J Surg Res. 2017 May 15;212:77-85. doi: 10.1016/j.jss.2016.11.052. Epub 2016 Dec 6.

Use of a pedicled omental flap to reduce inflammation and vascularize an abdominal wall patch.

Author information

1
McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan.
2
McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
3
McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
4
Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan.
5
McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Electronic address: wagnerwr@upmc.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Although a variety of synthetic materials have been used to reconstruct tissue defects, these materials are associated with complications such as seromas, fistulas, chronic patient discomfort, and surgical site infection. While alternative, degradable materials that facilitate tissue growth have been examined. These materials can still trigger a foreign body inflammatory response that can lead to complications and discomfort.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

In this report, our objective was to determine the effect of placing a pedicled omental flap under a biodegradable, microfibrous polyurethane scaffold serving as a full-wall thickness replacement of the rat abdominal wall. It was hypothesized that the presence of the omental tissue would stimulate greater vascularization of the scaffold and act to reduce markers of elevated inflammation in the patch vicinity. For control purposes, a polydimethylsiloxane sheet was placed as a barrier between the omental tissue and the overlying microfibrous scaffold. Both groups were sacrificed 8 wk after the implantation, and immunohistological and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assessments were performed.

RESULTS:

The data showed omental tissue placement to be associated with increased vascularization, a greater local M2/M1 macrophage phenotype response, and mRNA levels reduced for inflammatory markers but increased for angiogenic and antiinflammatory factors.

CONCLUSIONS:

From a clinical perspective, the familiarity with utilizing omental flaps for an improved healing response and infection resistance should naturally be considered as new tissue engineering approaches that are translated to tissue beds where omental flap application is practical. This report provides data in support of this concept in a small animal model.

KEYWORDS:

Abdominal wall; Biodegradable patch; Inflammation; Macrophage; Omental flap; Vascularization

PMID:
28550925
DOI:
10.1016/j.jss.2016.11.052
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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