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Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2017 Jul;129:206-212. doi: 10.1016/j.diabres.2017.05.010. Epub 2017 May 16.

Divided consumption of late-night-dinner improves glycemic excursions in patients with type 2 diabetes: A randomized cross-over clinical trial.

Author information

1
Department of Food and Nutrition, Kyoto Women's University, Kyoto, Japan. Electronic address: imais@kyoto-wu.ac.jp.
2
Kajiyama Clinic, Kyoto, Japan; Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyoto, Japan.
3
Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyoto, Japan.
4
St. Mary's Hospital, Himeji, Japan.
5
Department of Food and Nutrition, Kyoto Women's University, Kyoto, Japan.
6
Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Kyoto University, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan.

Abstract

AIMS:

To explore the acute effect of late-night-dinner and divided dinner on postprandial glucose levels in patients with type 2 diabetes.

METHODS:

Sixteen patients were randomly assigned to this cross-over study. Each patient wore a continuous glucose monitor for 5days and consumed identical test meals for 3days. Patients consumed the test meals of dinner at 2100h (D21) or divided dinner (vegetable and rice at 1800h and the vegetable and the main dish at 2100h) on the second or fourth day, and dinner at 1800h (D18) on the third day. The daily glucose parameters were compared within-patient for 3days.

RESULTS:

D21 demonstrated significantly higher values of incremental area under the curve (IAUC) for glucose 2300 to 0800h (644±156vs. 147±63mmol/L×min, p<0.01, mean±standard error of the mean) and incremental glucose peak (IGP) after dinner (6.78±0.79 vs. 3.09±0.62mmol/L, p<0.01) compared to those of D18. Moreover, the mean amplitude of glycemic excursion (MAGE) of D21 tended to be higher than that of D18 (6.99±0.60 vs. 5.35±0.51mmol/L, p=0.077). However, the divided dinner significantly reduced IAUC 2300 to 0800h (142±60mmol/L×min, p<0.01), IGP after dinner (3.75±0.58mmol/L, p<0.01), and MAGE (5.33±0.41mmol/L, p<0.01) compared to those of D21.

CONCLUSION:

Our findings demonstrated that consuming late-night-dinner led to postprandial hyperglycemia, and this postprandial hyperglycemia can be ameliorated by consuming a divided dinner.

KEYWORDS:

Continuous glucose monitor; Diet; Dinner; Glucose excursion; Postprandial blood glucose; Type 2 diabetes mellitus

PMID:
28549298
DOI:
10.1016/j.diabres.2017.05.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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