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Exp Mol Med. 2017 May 26;49(5):e339. doi: 10.1038/emm.2017.24.

The interplay between host immune cells and gut microbiota in chronic inflammatory diseases.

Author information

1
Center for Integrative Rheumatoid Transcriptomics and Dynamics, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea.
2
Department of Pathology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
3
Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.

Abstract

Many benefits provided by the gut microbiota to the host rely on its intricate interactions with host cells. Perturbations of the gut microbiota, termed gut dysbiosis, affect the interplay between the gut microbiota and host cells, resulting in dysregulation of inflammation that contributes to the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease, multiple sclerosis, allergic asthma and rheumatoid arthritis. In this review, we provide an overview of how gut bacteria modulates host metabolic and immune functions, summarize studies that examined the roles of gut dysbiosis in chronic inflammatory diseases, and finally discuss measures to correct gut dysbiosis as potential therapeutics for chronic inflammatory diseases.

PMID:
28546562
PMCID:
PMC5454439
DOI:
10.1038/emm.2017.24
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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