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Arthritis Res Ther. 2017 May 25;19(1):108. doi: 10.1186/s13075-017-1320-2.

Ultrasound-detected bone erosion is a relapse risk factor after discontinuation of biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in patients with rheumatoid arthritis whose ultrasound power Doppler synovitis activity and clinical disease activity are well controlled.

Author information

1
Department of Community Medicine, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki, 852-8523, Japan. shin-ya@hotmail.co.jp.
2
Department of Public Health, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki, Japan. shin-ya@hotmail.co.jp.
3
Department of Immunology and Rheumatology, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki, Japan. shin-ya@hotmail.co.jp.
4
Department of Internal Medicine, Isahaya General Hospital, Isahaya, Japan.
5
Department of Immunology and Rheumatology, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki, Japan.
6
Department of Center for Comprehensive Community Care Education, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki, Japan.
7
Department of Internal Medicine, Japanese Red Cross Nagasaki Genbaku Hospital, Nagasaki, Japan.
8
Center for Rheumatic disease, Sasebo Chuo Hospital, Sasebo, Japan.
9
Department of Public Health, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki, Japan.
10
Department of Community Medicine, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki, 852-8523, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

In the present study, we explored the risk factors for relapse after discontinuation of biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (bDMARD) therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) whose ultrasound power Doppler (PD) synovitis activity and clinical disease activity were well controlled.

METHODS:

In this observational study in clinical practice, the inclusion criteria were based on ultrasound disease activity and clinical disease activity, set as low or remission (Disease Activity Score in 28 joints based on erythrocyte sedimentation rate <3.2). Ultrasound was performed in 22 joints of bilateral hands at discontinuation for evaluating synovitis severity and presence of bone erosion. Patients with a maximum PD score ā‰¤1 in each joint were enrolled. Forty patients with RA were consecutively recruited (November 2010-March 2015) and discontinued bDMARD therapy. Variables at the initiation and discontinuation of bDMARD therapy that were predictive of relapse during the 12 months after discontinuation were assessed.

RESULTS:

The median patient age was 54.5 years, and the median disease duration was 3.5 years. Nineteen (47.5%) patients relapsed during the 12 months after the discontinuation of bDMARD therapy. Logistic regression analysis revealed that only the presence of bone erosion detected by ultrasound at discontinuation was predictive of relapse (OR 8.35, 95% CI 1.78-53.2, pā€‰=ā€‰0.006). No clinical characteristics or serologic biomarkers were significantly different between the relapse and nonrelapse patients. The ultrasound synovitis scores did not differ significantly between the groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our findings are the first evidence that ultrasound bone erosion may be a relapse risk factor after the discontinuation of bDMARD therapy in patients with RA whose PD synovitis activity and clinical disease activity are well controlled.

KEYWORDS:

Biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drug; Discontinuation; RA; Remission; Rheumatoid arthritis; Ultrasound; bDMARD

PMID:
28545509
PMCID:
PMC5445491
DOI:
10.1186/s13075-017-1320-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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