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Early Hum Dev. 2017 Jul;110:44-49. doi: 10.1016/j.earlhumdev.2017.04.016. Epub 2017 May 23.

Long-term attention deficits combined with subcortical and cortical structural central nervous system alterations in young adults born small for gestational age.

Author information

1
Research Center, Sainte-Justine University Hospital, 3175, Chemin de la Cote-Sainte-Catherine, Montreal, Quebec H3T1C5, Canada.
2
ImExHS, Imex-Research, Calle 93 # 16 - 46, Of 502, Edificio Zen Office, Bogotá, Colombia; Kangaroo Foundation, Bogotá, Colombia; IMAGINE, Systems and Computing Engineering, Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá, Colombia.
3
Kangaroo Foundation, Bogotá, Colombia; Hospital Universitario San Ignacio, Bogotá, Colombia.
4
Fundación Hospital Infantil Universitario de San José, Bogotá, Colombia.
5
IMAGINE, Systems and Computing Engineering, Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá, Colombia.
6
Kangaroo Foundation, Bogotá, Colombia.
7
Research Center, Sainte-Justine University Hospital, 3175, Chemin de la Cote-Sainte-Catherine, Montreal, Quebec H3T1C5, Canada; Department of Pediatrics and Pharmacology, University of Montreal, C.P.6128, succursale Centre-ville, Montreal, Quebec H3C3J7, Canada. Electronic address: ga.lodygensky@umontreal.ca.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Being born small for gestational age has been associated with neurodevelopmental disabilities and smaller gray matter volumes in childhood. However, it is not known if these changes persist in adults and whether SGA has any impact on attention memory and IQ.

AIMS:

The goal of this study was to evaluate the association between birth weight and gray matter anatomy in adults born small for gestational age at term, in relation to IQ, attention and memory.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

This prospective follow-up study at age 20 included 39 adults born small for gestational age at term and 37 adults born appropriate for gestational age at term. Detailed neurocognitive skills were assessed (IQ, attention and memory). Anatomical images were analyzed using Voxel-Based-Morphometry and FreeSurfer.

RESULTS:

Adults born small for gestational age at term had lower performances in subtests assessing attention and executive functions. They also showed smaller total intracranial volume; smaller volumes and surface areas in the frontal lobe, inferior/middle parietal and temporal gyrus; smaller cerebellum, thalamus and basal ganglia volumes. Interestingly, all these structures correlated with attention subtests.

CONCLUSION:

These results highlight the persistent effects of being born small for gestational age on attention and associated brain structures.

KEYWORDS:

Adults; Attention; Cerebral MRI; FreeSurfer; Small for gestational age; Voxel-based morphometry

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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