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Maturitas. 2017 Jun;100:8-15. doi: 10.1016/j.maturitas.2017.02.016. Epub 2017 Mar 21.

Low vitamin D levels increase the risk of type 2 diabetes in older adults: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine (DIMED), Geriatrics Division, University of Padova, Italy.
2
Institution for clinical Research and Education in Medicine (IREM), Padova, Italy; Department of Neurosciences, University of Padova, Padova, Italy.
3
National Research Council, Neuroscience Institute, Aging Branch, Padova, Italy.
4
Faculty of Health, Social Care and Education, Anglia Ruskin University,Bishop Hall Lane, Chelmsford CM1 1SQ, UK.
5
Department of Nutrition and Obesity, AP-HP, Maritime Hospital, F-62600 Berck, France.
6
Department of Nutrition and Obesity, AP-HP, Maritime Hospital, F-62600 Berck, France; Physiotherapy Department, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, Denmark Hill, London, SE5 8AZ, United Kingdom; Health Service and Population Research Department, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience King's College London, De Crespigny Park, London, Box SE5 8AF, United Kingdom. Electronic address: brendon.stubbs@kcl.ac.uk.

Abstract

Low serum levels of 25 hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) (hypovitaminosis D) is common in older adults and associated with several negative outcomes. The association between hypovitaminosis D and diabetes in older adults is equivocal, however. We conducted a meta-analysis investigating if hypovitaminosis D is associated with diabetes in prospective studies among older participants. Two investigators systematically searched major electronic databases, from inception until 10/07/2016. The cumulative incidence of diabetes among groups was estimated according to baseline serum 25OHD levels. Random effect models were used to assess the association between hypovitaminosis D and diabetes at follow-up. From 4268 non-duplicate hits, 9 studies were included; these followed 28,258 participants with a mean age of 67.7 years for a median of 7.7 years. Compared with higher levels of 25OHD, lower levels of 25OHD were associated with a higher risk of developing diabetes (6 studies; n=13,563; RR=1.31; 95% CI: 1.11-1.54; I2=37%). The findings remained significant after adjusting for a median of 11 potential confounders in all the studies available (9 studies; n=28,258; RR=1.17; 95% CI: 1.03-1.33; p=0.02; I2=0%). In conclusion, our data suggest that hypovitaminosis D is associated with an elevated risk of future diabetes in older people. Future longitudinal studies are required and should seek to confirm these findings and explore potential pathophysiological underpinnings.

KEYWORDS:

Aged; Diabetes; Hypovitaminosis D; Meta-analysis; Vitamin D

PMID:
28539181
DOI:
10.1016/j.maturitas.2017.02.016
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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