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An Bras Dermatol. 2017 Mar-Apr;92(2):221-225. doi: 10.1590/abd1806-4841.20174846.

Refining the ideas of "ethnic" skin.

Author information

1
Department of Dermatology, Juarez Hospital - Mexico City, Mexico.
2
Department of Dermatology, University of Chile - Santiago de Chile, Chile.
3
Department of Dermatology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA USA.
4
Department of Dermatology, Universidad Central de Venezuela - Caracas, Venezuela.
5
Department of Dermatology, University of Buenos Aires - Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Abstract

Skin disease occur worldwide, affecting people of all nationalities and all skin types. These diseases may have a genetic component and may manifest differently in specific population groups; however, there has been little study on this aspect. If population-based differences exist, it is reasonable to assume that understanding these differences may optimize treatment. While there is a relative paucity of information about similarities and differences in skin diseases around the world, the knowledge-base is expanding. One challenge in understanding population-based variations is posed by terminology used in the literature: including ethnic skin, Hispanic skin, Asian skin, and skin of color. As will be discussed in this article, we recommend that the first three descriptors are no longer used in dermatology because they refer to nonspecific groups of people. In contrast, "skin of color" may be used - perhaps with further refinements in the future - as a term that relates to skin biology and provides relevant information to dermatologists.

PMID:
28538883
PMCID:
PMC5429109
DOI:
10.1590/abd1806-4841.20174846
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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