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Mar Pollut Bull. 2017 Jul 15;120(1-2):309-321. doi: 10.1016/j.marpolbul.2017.05.042. Epub 2017 May 20.

Dispersal and assimilation of an aquaculture waste subsidy in a low productivity coastal environment.

Author information

1
Sustainable Aquaculture Laboratory - Temperate and Tropical, School of BioSciences, University of Melbourne, VIC 3010, Australia; Oceans and Atmosphere, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Castray Esplanade, Hobart, TAS 7000, Australia. Electronic address: camille.white@utas.edu.au.
2
Oceans and Atmosphere, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Castray Esplanade, Hobart, TAS 7000, Australia.
3
Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 49, Hobart, TAS 7000, Australia.
4
Sustainable Aquaculture Laboratory - Temperate and Tropical, School of BioSciences, University of Melbourne, VIC 3010, Australia.

Abstract

To understand dispersal and assimilation of aquaculture waste subsidies in a naturally low-productivity environment, we applied a novel, rapid transmethylation technique to analyse sediment and biota fatty acid composition. This technique was initially validated at Atlantic salmon farms in Macquarie Harbour, Australia, where sediments were collected at farm and control locations. Subsequently, sediment, benthic polychaete and zooplankton were sampled at sites 0, 50, 250, 500 and 1000m distant from multiple cages. Results demonstrated an acute deposition zone up to 50m from cages and a diffuse zone extending 500m from cages. Changes in sediment concentration of linoleic acid, oleic acid and total fatty acids were effective tracers of farm deposition. Bacterial biomarkers indicated that aquaculture waste stimulates bacterial productivity in sediments, with elevated biomarker concentrations also detected in benthic polychaetes. Overall, fatty acid analysis was a sensitive technique to characterize the benthic footprint of aquaculture influence.

KEYWORDS:

Aquaculture; Bacterial productivity; Biomarker; Fatty acid; Macquarie Harbour; Salmon

PMID:
28535958
DOI:
10.1016/j.marpolbul.2017.05.042
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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