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Pain Physician. 2017 May;20(4):E499-E505.

Evaluation of Depression in Subacute Low Back Pain: A Case Control Study.

Author information

1
Department of Health Sciences, Universidade da Coruña Ferrol, Spain.
2
Modeling, Optimization, and Statistical Inference Research Group,Universidade da Coruña Ferrol, Spain.
3
Department of Nursing and Physical Therapy, Institute of Biomedicine, University of León, Ponferrada, León, Spain.
4
Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Spain.
5
Department of Physiotherapy, Physical Therapy and Health Sciences Research Group, European University of Madrid, Villaviciosa de Odón, Madrid.
6
School of Nursing, Physiotherapy, and Podiatry, Universadad Complutense de Madrid, Spain.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Low back pain (LBP) is the most common musculoskeletal disorder affecting the general population and it is believed to be associated with depression.

OBJECTIVE:

The study aim was to describe and compare the impact in a sample of people with subacute LBP (SLBP) and patients without LBP with normalized reference values in the light of the scores obtained with regard using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI).

STUDY DESIGN:

This was a case-control study.

SETTINGS:

Physiotherapist area at a care center.

METHODS:

A sample of 164 participants of a mean age of 41.45 ± 0.97 came to a physical therapy clinic where self-reported data were registered, informants' professional activity was determined, and the scores obtained were compared in the BDI.

RESULTS:

Total BDI scores at SLBP and their controls were 21.52 ± 6.93 (11 - 43) and 17.30 ± 5.09 (11 - 30), respectively (P < 0.001). The SLBP patient has 2.12 times more likely to have moderate depression (OR 2.12 (1.07 - 4.18) and 18.82 times more likely to have serious depression (OR 18.82 (1.06 - 331.81) compared to their controls (P < 0.05).

LIMITATIONS:

The study was not a randomized controlled trial. Although primary outcome data were self-reported, the assessor was not blinded.

CONCLUSIONS:

People with SLBP also have a significant increase in depression based on BDI scores, regardless of gender.

PMID:
28535558
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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