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Biol Blood Marrow Transplant. 2017 Sep;23(9):1567-1572. doi: 10.1016/j.bbmt.2017.05.015. Epub 2017 May 19.

Music Therapy for Symptom Management After Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation: Results From a Randomized Study.

Author information

1
Arts and Medicine Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Lyndhurst, Ohio. Electronic address: batesd2@ccf.org.
2
Taussig Cancer Institute, Blood and Marrow Transplant Program, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio.
3
Taussig Cancer Institute, Blood and Marrow Transplant Program, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio; Quantitative Health Sciences, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio.
4
Arts and Medicine Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Lyndhurst, Ohio.

Abstract

High-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) is frequently performed in patients with hematologic malignancies. ASCT can result in significant nausea, pain, and discomfort. Supportive care has improved, and pharmacologic therapies are frequently used, but with limitations. Music has been demonstrated to improve nausea and pain in patients undergoing chemotherapy, but little data are available regarding the effects of music therapy in the transplantation setting. In a prospective study, patients with lymphoma or multiple myeloma undergoing ASCT were randomized to receive either interactive music therapy with a board-certified music therapist or no music therapy. The music therapy arm received 2 music therapy sessions on days +1 and +5. Primary outcomes were perception of pain and nausea measured on a visual analog scale. Secondary outcomes were narcotic pain medication use from day -1 to day +5 and impact of ASCT on patient mood as assessed by Profile of Mood States (POMS) on day +5. Eighty-two patients were enrolled, with 37 in the music therapy arm and 45 in the no music therapy arm. Patients who received MT had slightly increased nausea by day +7 compared with the no music therapy patients. The music therapy and no music therapy patients had similar pain scores; however, the patients who received music therapy used significantly less narcotic pain medication (median, 24 mg versus 73 mg; P = .038). Music therapy may be a viable nonpharmacologic method of pain management for patients undergoing ASCT; the music therapy patients required significantly fewer morphine equivalent doses compared with the no music therapy patients. Additional research is needed to better understand the effects of music therapy on patient-perceived symptoms, such as pain and nausea.

KEYWORDS:

Autologous stem cell transplant; Music therapy; Pain medication

PMID:
28533058
DOI:
10.1016/j.bbmt.2017.05.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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