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J Bodyw Mov Ther. 2017 Apr;21(2):446-451. doi: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.11.006. Epub 2016 Nov 14.

Effect of self-myofascial release on myofascial pain, muscle flexibility, and strength: A narrative review.

Author information

1
Department of Physical Therapy, Recanati School for Community Health Professions, Faculty of Health Sciences at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel. Electronic address: kalichman@hotmail.com.
2
Department of Physical Therapy, Recanati School for Community Health Professions, Faculty of Health Sciences at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Numerous techniques have been employed to treat myofascial pain syndrome. Self-myofascial release (SMFR) is a relatively new technique of soft tissue mobilization. The simplicity and portability of the SMFR tools allow it to be easily implemented in any type of fitness or rehabilitation program. It is an active method and can be used by anyone at home or at the workplace.

OBJECTIVE:

To review the current methods of SMFR, their mechanisms, and efficacy in treating myofascial pain, improving muscle flexibility and strength.

METHODS:

PubMed, Google Scholar, and PEDro databases were searched without search limitations from inception until July 2016 for terms relating to SMFR.

RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS:

During the past decade, therapists and fitness professionals have implemented SMFR mainly via foam rolling as a recovery or maintenance tool. Researchers observed a significant increase in the joint range of motion after using the SMFR technique and no decrease in muscle force or changes in performance after treatment with SMFR. SMFR has been widely used by health-care professionals in treating myofascial pain. However, we found no clinical trials which evaluated the influence of SMFR on myofascial pain. There is an acute need for these trials to evaluate the efficacy and effectiveness of SMFR in the treatment of the myofascial syndrome.

KEYWORDS:

Foam rolling; Myofascial pain; Myofascial release; Self-myofascial release; Stretching; Trigger points

PMID:
28532889
DOI:
10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.11.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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