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Vet Microbiol. 2017 May;204:43-45. doi: 10.1016/j.vetmic.2017.04.008. Epub 2017 Apr 15.

Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis menigoencephalitis in a cat.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Small Animal Clinics, Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Azabu University, 1-17-71, Fuchinobe, Chuo, Sagamihara, Kanagawa, 252-5201, Japan. Electronic address: madarame@azabu-u.ac.jp.
2
Laboratory of Surgery II, Department of Veterinary Medicine, Azabu University, 1-17-71, Fuchinobe, Chuo, Sagamihara, Kanagawa, 252-5201, Japan.
3
Laboratory of Pathology, School of Life and Environmental Science, Azabu University, 1-17-71, Fuchinobe, Chuo, Sagamihara, Kanagawa, 252-5201, Japan.
4
Research Institute of Biosciences, Azabu University, 1-17-71, Fuchinobe, Chuo, Sagamihara, Kanagawa, 252-5201, Japan.
5
Research and Education Center for Prevention of Global Infectious Diseases of Animals, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 3-5-8 Saiwai, Fuchu, Tokyo, 183-8509, Japan.
6
Sanritsu Zelkova Veterinary Laboratory, 2-5-8 Kuji, Takatsu-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa, 213-0032, Japan.

Abstract

A 33-month old, neutered female Abyssinian cat died. The cat had sudden onset of widespread neurologic signs about half a year after birth. Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis (MAH) group was isolated and identified from the brain of a cat affected with pyogranulomatous meningoencephalitis. The central nervous system (CNS) was involved in the disseminated MAH infection. MAH infection should be considered in cats with neurologic signs in regard to zoonotic aspects. Comparatively, this is a first case of MAH infection observed in the brain in either humans or animals.

PMID:
28532804
DOI:
10.1016/j.vetmic.2017.04.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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