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Am J Prev Med. 2017 Oct;53(4):441-448. doi: 10.1016/j.amepre.2017.03.020. Epub 2017 May 19.

Secondhand Smoke Exposure and Pediatric Healthcare Visits and Hospitalizations.

Author information

1
School of Human Services, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio. Electronic address: ashley.merianos@uc.edu.
2
Division of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Department of Environmental Health, College of Medicine, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio.
3
Division of Emergency Medicine, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, College of Medicine, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

This study assessed the relationship between secondhand smoke exposure (SHSe) as measured by serum cotinine and healthcare utilization among children.

METHODS:

In 2016, the 2009-2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data were analyzed including 4,985 children aged 3-19 years. Associations between SHSe and having a routine place for healthcare, type of place, and hospital utilization were examined using logistic regression models. Poisson regression analyses assessed the relationship between SHSe and number of hospital admissions. Relationships between SHSe and acute care visits and hospital utilization were examined among asthmatic children.

RESULTS:

SHSe level did not differ by having a routine place for healthcare, although children with high SHSe indicative of active smoking (cotinine ≥3 ng/mL) were 3.49 times (95% CI=1.77, 6.89) more likely to use an emergency department. Children with high SHSe were 2.85 times (95% CI=1.87, 4.34) more likely to have had an overnight hospital stay. Children with high SHSe had 2.05 times (95% CI=1.46, 2.87) the risk of having a higher number of hospital admissions for overnight stays versus children with no SHSe (cotinine <0.05 ng/mL). Among asthmatic children, those with high SHSe and low SHSe (cotinine 0.05-2.99 ng/mL) were more likely to have an acute care visit, overnight hospital stay, and higher number of hospital admissions than asthmatic children with no SHSe.

CONCLUSIONS:

High SHSe is associated with increased healthcare utilization. The emergency department and inpatient settings are important venues in which to routinely offer cessation and SHSe reduction interventions.

PMID:
28532658
PMCID:
PMC5610064
DOI:
10.1016/j.amepre.2017.03.020
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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