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Front Psychol. 2017 May 5;8:313. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2017.00313. eCollection 2017.

Decision-Making Processes in the Workplace: How Exhaustion, Lack of Resources and Job Demands Impair Them and Affect Performance.

Author information

1
Human Sciences, University of VeronaVerona, Italy.
2
Human Performance Management, Industrial Engineering and Innovation Sciences, Eindhoven University of TechnologyEindhoven, Netherlands.
3
Developmental Psychology, Tilburg UniversityTilburg, Netherlands.

Abstract

The present study aims to connect more the I/O and the decision-making psychological domains, by showing how some common components across jobs interfere with decision-making and affecting performance. Two distinct constructs that can contribute to positive workplace performance have been considered: decision-making competency (DMCy) and decision environment management (DEM). Both factors are presumed to involve self-regulatory mechanisms connected to decision processes by influencing performance in relation to work environment conditions. In the framework of the job demands-resources (JD-R) model, the present study tested how such components as job demands, job resources and exhaustion can moderate decision-making processes and performance, where high resources are advantageous for decision-making processes and performance at work, while the same effect happens with low job demands and/or low exhaustion. In line with the formulated hypotheses, results confirm the relations between both the decision-making competences, performance (i.e., in-role and extra-role) and moderators considered. In particular, employees with low levels of DMCy show to be more sensitive to job demands toward in-role performance, whereas high DEM levels increase the sensitivity of employees toward job resources and exhaustion in relation to extra-role performance. These findings indicate that decision-making processes, as well as work environment conditions, are jointly related to employee functioning.

KEYWORDS:

decision environment management; decision-making competency; exhaustion; job demands; job resources; self-regulation

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