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Vaccine. 2017 Jun 14;35(27):3490-3497. doi: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2017.05.013. Epub 2017 May 18.

Impact and effectiveness of childhood varicella vaccine program in Queensland, Australia.

Author information

1
School of Public Health, The University of Queensland, Herston, QLD 4006, Australia. Electronic address: sarah.sheridan@unsw.edu.au.
2
National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance of Vaccine Preventable Diseases, The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Westmead, NSW 2145, Australia; Discipline of Child and Adolescent Health, University of Sydney, The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Westmead, NSW 2145, Australia. Electronic address: helen.quinn@health.nsw.gov.au.
3
National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance of Vaccine Preventable Diseases, The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Westmead, NSW 2145, Australia. Electronic address: brynley.hull@health.nsw.gov.au.
4
School of Public Health, The University of Queensland, Herston, QLD 4006, Australia; UQ Child Health Research Centre, School of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Herston, QLD 4006, Australia; Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Griffith University, Gold Coast, QLD 4222, Australia. Electronic address: r.ware@uq.edu.au.
5
Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Griffith University, Gold Coast, QLD 4222, Australia; Departments of Infectious Disease and Paediatrics, Gold Coast Health, Gold Coast, QLD 4222, Australia. Electronic address: k.grimwood@griffith.edu.au.
6
UQ Child Health Research Centre, School of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Herston, QLD 4006, Australia; Communicable Diseases Branch, Queensland Health, Herston, QLD 4006, Australia. Electronic address: sblambert@uq.edu.au.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

In November 2005, Australia introduced a publicly funded single dose of varicella vaccine for children aged 18-months. We describe the impact of this program on varicella hospitalisations in Queensland and provide the first assessment of single-dose varicella vaccine effectiveness in Australia since the program commenced.

METHODS:

Age-standardised varicella hospitalisation rates were calculated for 2000-2014 and pre- and post-public funding period rates compared. Case-control studies were conducted to investigate the association between vaccine receipt and both varicella hospitalisations and uncomplicated varicella emergency department presentations. Cases were matched to controls from a population-based register by date of birth and state of residence. Vaccine effectiveness was calculated as (1-odds ratio)×100%.

RESULTS:

Compared to the pre-funded period (2000-2003), age-standardised varicella hospitalisation rates declined by more than 70% in 2011-2014 with varicella principal diagnosis rates declining from 5.7 to 1.6 per 100,000 population per year. Varicella vaccine effectiveness at preventing hospitalisation with a principal diagnosis of varicella among children aged 19-months to 6-years was 81.9% (95% confidence interval: 61.8-91.4%), while for emergency department presentations among children aged 19-months to 8-years it was 57.9% (95% confidence interval: 48.5-65.5%).

CONCLUSIONS:

In Australia, the single-dose varicella vaccination program has substantially reduced varicella morbidity. The single-dose varicella vaccine schedule is moderately-to-highly effective against hospitalisation, but appears less effective against emergency department presentations.

KEYWORDS:

Vaccine-effectiveness; Varicella; Varicella vaccine

PMID:
28528765
DOI:
10.1016/j.vaccine.2017.05.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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