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J Formos Med Assoc. 2018 May;117(5):413-420. doi: 10.1016/j.jfma.2017.04.023. Epub 2017 May 18.

Maternal and neonatal outcomes of respiratory failure during pregnancy.

Author information

1
Department of Thoracic Medicine, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Linkou, Taiwan.
2
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology (K-CC, C-PJ), Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Linkou, Taiwan.
3
Department of Thoracic Medicine, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Linkou, Taiwan. Electronic address: kck0502@cgmh.org.tw.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Obstetric patients comprise a limited portion of intensive care unit patients, but they often present with unfamiliar conditions and exhibit the potential for catastrophic deterioration. This study evaluated the maternal and neonatal outcomes of respiratory failure during pregnancy.

METHODS:

Information on 71 patients at >25 weeks gestation in the ICU with respiratory failure was recorded between 2009 and 2013. The characteristics and outcomes of mothers and fetuses were determined through a retrospective chart review and evaluated using Student's t test, chi-square test, and Fisher's exact test.

RESULTS:

The leading causes of respiratory failure were postpartum hemorrhage and severe preeclampsia in the obstetric causes group and pneumonia in the nonobstetric causes group during pregnancy and the peripartum period. The non-obstetric causes group exhibited a higher incidence of acute respiratory distress syndrome and renal replacement therapy as well as requiring more ventilator days. The patients in the obstetric causes group showed significant improvement after delivery in the partial pressure of arterial oxygen to the fraction of inspired oxygen and peak inspiratory pressure decrease. Both groups exhibited high incidences of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome. Neonatal complications resulting from meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) and sepsis were more common in the non-obstetric causes group; however, neurological development impairment was more common in the obstetric causes group.

CONCLUSION:

Obstetric cause was associated with longer ventilator free days and fewer episodes of ARDS after delivery. Neonatal complications resulting from different etiologies of respiratory failure were found to differ.

KEYWORDS:

Acute respiratory distress syndrome; Neonatal; Obstetric; Outcome; Respiratory failure

PMID:
28528140
DOI:
10.1016/j.jfma.2017.04.023
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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