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Dermatol Ther (Heidelb). 2017 Jun;7(2):227-242. doi: 10.1007/s13555-017-0183-4. Epub 2017 May 19.

Dietary Behaviors in Psoriasis: Patient-Reported Outcomes from a U.S. National Survey.

Author information

1
Department of Dermatology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA. ladiafifi@gmail.com.
2
Department of Dermatology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Psoriasis patients demonstrate high interest in the role of diet on their skin condition. However, data are lacking to describe dietary interventions among psoriasis patients and associated outcomes. This study aims to identify common dietary habits, interventions and perceptions among patients with psoriasis, and to examine patient-reported skin outcomes in response to these interventions.

METHODS:

We administered a 61-question survey to the National Psoriasis Foundation membership asking psoriasis patients about dietary habits, modifications, skin responses, and perceptions.

RESULTS:

A total of 1206 psoriasis patients responded to the survey. Compared to age- and sex-matched controls, psoriasis patients consumed significantly less sugar, whole grain fiber, dairy, and calcium (p < 0.001), while consuming more fruits, vegetables, and legumes (p < 0.01). Eighty-six percent of respondents reported use of a dietary modification. The percentage of patients reporting skin improvement was greatest after reducing alcohol (53.8%), gluten (53.4%), nightshades (52.1%), and after adding fish oil/omega-3 (44.6%), vegetables (42.5%), and oral vitamin D (41%). Specific diets with the most patients reporting a favorable skin response were Pagano (72.2%), vegan (70%), and Paleolithic (68.9%). Additionally, 41.8% of psoriasis respondents reported that a motivation for attempting dietary changes was to improve overall health.

CONCLUSION:

This national survey is among the first to report the dietary behaviors of patients with psoriasis. The data provided from this large cohort may benefit patients and clinicians as they discuss the role of diet in managing both psoriasis and associated cardiometabolic comorbidities.

KEYWORDS:

Diet; Nutrition; Psoriasis; Psoriatic arthritis; Triggers

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