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BMC Med Genet. 2017 May 19;18(1):57. doi: 10.1186/s12881-017-0419-2.

Pancreas and gallbladder agenesis in a newborn with semilobar holoprosencephaly, a case report.

Author information

1
Diabetes Research Center, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 103, Jette, 1090, Brussels, Belgium.
2
Diabetes Clinic, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels, Belgium.
3
Center for Medical Genetics, Reproduction and Genetics, Reproduction Genetics and Regenerative Medicine, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Jette, Belgium.
4
Department of Pathology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Jette, Belgium.
5
Department of Pediatrics, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Jette, Belgium.
6
Institute of Biomedical and Clinical Science, University of Exeter Medical School, Exeter, UK.
7
Diabetes Research Center, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 103, Jette, 1090, Brussels, Belgium. Harry.Heimberg@vub.ac.be.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Pancreatic agenesis is an extremely rare cause of neonatal diabetes mellitus and has enabled the discovery of several key transcription factors essential for normal pancreas and beta cell development.

CASE PRESENTATION:

We report a case of a Caucasian female with complete pancreatic agenesis occurring together with semilobar holoprosencephaly (HPE), a more common brain developmental disorder. Clinical findings were later confirmed by autopsy, which also identified agenesis of the gallbladder. Although the sequences of a selected set of genes related to pancreas agenesis or HPE were wild-type, the patient's phenotype suggests a genetic defect that emerges early in embryonic development of brain, gallbladder and pancreas.

CONCLUSIONS:

Developmental defects of the pancreas and brain can occur together. Identifying the genetic defect may identify a novel key regulator in beta cell development.

KEYWORDS:

Holoprosencephaly; Pancreas agenesis; Premanent neonatal diabetes mellitus

PMID:
28525974
PMCID:
PMC5438508
DOI:
10.1186/s12881-017-0419-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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