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BMC Immunol. 2017 May 19;18(1):27. doi: 10.1186/s12865-017-0212-1.

The immunoregulatory role of alpha enolase in dendritic cell function during Chlamydia infection.

Author information

1
Department of Microbiology, Biochemistry, and Immunology, Morehouse School of Medicine, 720 Westview Drive S.W., Atlanta, GA, 30310, USA.
2
Department of Biology, Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, GA, 30314, USA.
3
Department of Microbiology, Biochemistry, and Immunology, Morehouse School of Medicine, 720 Westview Drive S.W., Atlanta, GA, 30310, USA. yomosun@msm.edu.
4
Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC), Atlanta, GA, 30333, USA.
5
Department of Microbiology, Biochemistry, and Immunology, Morehouse School of Medicine, 720 Westview Drive S.W., Atlanta, GA, 30310, USA. qhe@msm.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

We have previously reported that interleukin-10 (IL-10) deficient dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen presenting cells that induced elevated protective immunity against Chlamydia. To further investigate the molecular and biochemical mechanism underlying the superior immunostimulatory property of IL-10 deficient DCs we performed proteomic analysis on protein profiles from Chlamydia-pulsed wild-type (WT) and IL-10-/- DCs to identify differentially expressed proteins with immunomodulatory properties.

RESULTS:

The results showed that alpha enolase (ENO1), a metabolic enzyme involved in the last step of glycolysis was significantly upregulated in Chlamydia-pulsed IL-10-/- DCs compared to WT DCs. We further studied the immunoregulatory role of ENO1 in DC function by generating ENO1 knockdown DCs, using lentiviral siRNA technology. We analyzed the effect of the ENO1 knockdown on DC functions after pulsing with Chlamydia. Pyruvate assay, transmission electron microscopy, flow cytometry, confocal microscopy, cytokine, T-cell activation and adoptive transfer assays were also used to study DC function. The results showed that ENO1 knockdown DCs had impaired maturation and activation, with significant decrease in intracellular pyruvate concentration as compared with the Chlamydia-pulsed WT DCs. Adoptive transfer of Chlamydia-pulsed ENO1 knockdown DCs were poorly immunogenic in vitro and in vivo, especially the ability to induce protective immunity against genital chlamydia infection. The marked remodeling of the mitochondrial morphology of Chlamydia-pulsed ENO1 knockdown DCs compared to the Chlamydia-pulsed WT DCs was associated with the dysregulation of translocase of the outer membrane (TOM) 20 and adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT) 1/2/3/4 that regulate mitochondrial permeability. The results suggest that an enhanced glycolysis is required for efficient antigen processing and presentation by DCs to induce a robust immune response.

CONCLUSIONS:

The upregulation of ENO1 contributes to the superior immunostimulatory function of IL-10 deficient DCs. Our studies indicated that ENO1 deficiency causes the reduced production of pyruvate, which then contributes to a dysfunction in mitochondrial homeostasis that may affect DC survival, maturation and antigen presenting properties. Modulation of ENO1 thus provides a potentially effective strategy to boost DC function and promote immunity against infectious and non-infectious diseases.

KEYWORDS:

Alpha enolase; Chlamydia; Dendritic cells; ENO1; Metabolism

PMID:
28525970
PMCID:
PMC5437423
DOI:
10.1186/s12865-017-0212-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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