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J Affect Disord. 2017 Sep;219:58-63. doi: 10.1016/j.jad.2017.05.012. Epub 2017 May 8.

Effect of exercise augmentation of cognitive behavioural therapy for the treatment of suicidal ideation and depression.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, Alzahra University, Iran. Electronic address: Abdollahi.abbas58@gmail.com.
2
Department of Psychology, University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada.
3
Department of psychology, Semnan University, Semnan, Iran.
4
Department of Psychology, Alzahra University, Iran.
5
Department of Psychology, Shahid Beheshti University, Iran.
6
Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Sweden.
7
Department of Psychology, Allameh Tabataba'i University, Iran.
8
Shiraz Geriatric Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Suicidal ideation and depression are prevalent and costly conditions that reduce quality of life. This study was designed to determine the efficacy of exercise as an adjunct to cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for suicidal ideation and depression among depressed individuals.

METHODS:

In a randomized clinical trial, 54 mildly to moderately depressed patients (54% female, mean age=48.25) were assigned to a combined CBT and exercise group or to a CBT only group. Both groups received one weekly session of therapy for 12 weeks, while the combined group also completed exercise three times weekly over the same period. Self-reported suicidal ideation, depression, and activities of daily living were measured at the beginning and the end of treatment.

RESULTS:

Multilevel modelling revealed greater improvements in suicidal ideation, depression, and activities of daily living in the combined CBT and exercise group, compared to the CBT only group.

LIMITATIONS:

No follow-up data were collected, so the long-term effects (i.e., maintenance of gains) is unclear.

CONCLUSIONS:

The findings revealed that exercise adjunct to CBT effectively decreases both depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation in mildly to moderately depressed individuals.

KEYWORDS:

Cognitive behavioural therapy; Exercise, Depression; Suicidal ideation

PMID:
28525821
DOI:
10.1016/j.jad.2017.05.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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