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Health Place. 2017 Jul;46:107-113. doi: 10.1016/j.healthplace.2017.05.002. Epub 2017 May 17.

Social and built-environment factors related to children's independent mobility: The importance of neighbourhood cohesion and connectedness.

Author information

1
SHORE and Whariki Research Centre, Massey University, P O Box 6137, Wellesley Street, New Zealand. Electronic address: j.lin@massey.ac.nz.
2
SHORE and Whariki Research Centre, Massey University, P O Box 6137, Wellesley Street, New Zealand.
3
School of Nursing, University of Auckland, Auckland 1142, New Zealand.
4
School of Global, Urban & Social Studies, RMIT University, Australia.

Abstract

This study examines aspects of neighbourhood social environments (namely, neighbourhood safety, cohesion and connection) and child-specific built environment attributes in relation to children's independent mobility. The results suggest that children aged 8-13 years with parents who perceive their neighbourhood as more cohesive and more connected, and are located closer to school, engaged in higher levels of independently mobile trips. The qualitative component of this research revealed that for NZ European, Māori, Samoan and other Pacific parents, 'people danger' was the most common concern for letting their children go out alone, whereas for Asian and Indian parents, 'traffic danger' was the most common reason for their concern.

KEYWORDS:

Built environment; Children; Independent mobility; Neighbourhood; Social environment

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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