Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Sleep. 2017 Jul 1;40(7). doi: 10.1093/sleep/zsx090.

Sleep During Menopausal Transition: A 6-Year Follow-Up.

Author information

1
Department of Physiology, Sleep Research Centre, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
2
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
3
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
4
Faculty of Medicine and Life Sciences, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
5
Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Medical Imaging Centre and Hospital Pharmacy, Pirkanmaa Hospital District, Tampere, Finland.
6
Auria Biobank, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
7
Department of Statistics, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
8
Paavo Nurmi Centre and Department of Health and Physical Activity, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
9
Department of Pulmonary Diseases, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland.
10
Division of Medicine, Department of Pulmonary Diseases, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.

Abstract

Study Objectives:

Menopausal transition is associated with increased dissatisfaction with sleep, but the effects on sleep architecture are conflicting. This prospective 6-year follow-up study was designed to evaluate the changes in sleep stages and sleep continuity that occur in women during menopausal transition.

Methods:

Sixty women (mean age 46.0 years, SD 0.9) participated. All women were premenopausal at baseline, and at the 6-year follow-up, women were in different stages of menopausal transition. Polysomnography was used to study sleep architecture at baseline and follow-up. The effects of aging and menopause (assessed as change in serum follicle-stimulating hormone [S-FSH]) on sleep architecture were evaluated using linear regression models.

Results:

After controlling for body mass index, vasomotor, and depressive symptoms, aging of 6 years resulted in shorter total sleep time (B -37.4, 95% confidence interval [CI] -71.5 to (-3.3)), lower sleep efficiency (B -6.5, 95%CI -12.7 to (-0.2)), as well as in increased transitions from slow-wave sleep (SWS) to wakefulness (B 1.0, 95%CI 0.1 to 1.9), wake after sleep onset (B 37.7, 95%CI 12.5 to 63.0), awakenings per hour (B 1.8, 95%CI 0.8 to 2.8), and arousal index (B 2.3, 95%CI 0.1 to 4.4). Higher S-FSH concentration in menopausal transition was associated with increased SWS (B 0.09, 95%CI 0.01 to 0.16) after controlling for confounding factors.

Conclusions:

A significant deterioration in sleep continuity occurs when women age from 46 to 52 years, but change from premenopausal to menopausal state restores some SWS.

KEYWORDS:

follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH); menopause; polysomnography (PSG); sleep architecture; sleep continuity; slow-wave sleep (SWS)

PMID:
28525646
DOI:
10.1093/sleep/zsx090
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems
Loading ...
Support Center