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Nutrients. 2017 May 18;9(5). pii: E511. doi: 10.3390/nu9050511.

Vegetable and Fruit Intake and Fracture-Related Hospitalisations: A Prospective Study of Older Women.

Author information

1
School of Medicine and Pharmacology, Royal Perth Hospital Unit, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6000, Australia. lauren.blekkenhorst@research.uwa.edu.au.
2
School of Medicine and Pharmacology, Royal Perth Hospital Unit, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6000, Australia. jonathan.hodgson@ecu.edu.au.
3
School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, WA 6027, Australia. jonathan.hodgson@ecu.edu.au.
4
Centre for Kidney Research, Children's Hospital at Westmead, Sydney, NSW 2145, Australia. joshua.lewis@sydney.edu.au.
5
School of Public Health, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia. joshua.lewis@sydney.edu.au.
6
School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, WA 6027, Australia. a.devine@ecu.edu.au.
7
Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Flinders University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA 5042, Australia. richard.woodman@flinders.edu.au.
8
School of Medicine and Pharmacology, QEII Medical Centre Unit, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6009, Australia. wai.lim@health.wa.gov.au.
9
Centre for Kidney Research, Children's Hospital at Westmead, Sydney, NSW 2145, Australia. germaine.wong@health.nsw.gov.au.
10
School of Medicine and Pharmacology, QEII Medical Centre Unit, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6009, Australia. kun.zhu@uwa.edu.au.
11
Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, and Department of Renal Medicine, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, WA 6009, Australia. kun.zhu@uwa.edu.au.
12
School of Medicine and Pharmacology, Royal Perth Hospital Unit, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6000, Australia. c.bondonno@ecu.edu.au.
13
School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, WA 6027, Australia. c.bondonno@ecu.edu.au.
14
School of Medicine and Pharmacology, Royal Perth Hospital Unit, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6000, Australia. natalie.ward@uwa.edu.au.
15
School of Biomedical Sciences & Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, WA 6102, Australia. natalie.ward@uwa.edu.au.
16
School of Medicine and Pharmacology, QEII Medical Centre Unit, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6009, Australia. richard.prince@uwa.edu.au.
17
Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, and Department of Renal Medicine, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, WA 6009, Australia. richard.prince@uwa.edu.au.

Abstract

The importance of vegetable and fruit intakes for the prevention of fracture in older women is not well understood. Few studies have explored vegetable and fruit intakes separately, or the associations of specific types of vegetables and fruits with fracture hospitalisations. The objective of this study was to examine the associations of vegetable and fruit intakes, separately, and specific types of vegetables and fruits with fracture-related hospitalisations in a prospective cohort of women aged ≥70 years. Vegetable and fruit intakes were assessed at baseline (1998) in 1468 women using a food frequency questionnaire. The incidence of fracture-related hospitalisations over 14.5 years of follow-up was determined using the Hospital Morbidity Data Collection, linked via the Western Australian Data Linkage System. Fractures were identified in 415 (28.3%) women, of which 158 (10.8%) were hip fractures. Higher intakes of vegetables, but not fruits, were associated with lower fracture incidence. In multivariable-adjusted models for vegetable types, cruciferous and allium vegetables were inversely associated with all fractures, with a hazard ratio (HR) (95% confidence interval) of 0.72 (0.54, 0.95) and 0.66 (0.49, 0.88), respectively, for the highest vs. lowest quartiles. Increasing vegetable intake, with an emphasis on cruciferous and allium vegetables, may prevent fractures in older postmenopausal women.

KEYWORDS:

allium; bone; cruciferous; fracture; fruit; postmenopausal women; vegetables

PMID:
28524097
PMCID:
PMC5452241
DOI:
10.3390/nu9050511
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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