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Adv Exp Med Biol. 2017;978:185-196. doi: 10.1007/978-3-319-53889-1_10.

DNA Methylation in Major Depressive Disorder.

Author information

1
Complex Disease Epigenetic Group, University of Exeter Medical School, RILD Building, RD&E Hospital Wonford, Barrack Road, Exeter, EX2 5DW, UK. e.pishva@exeter.ac.uk.
2
Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, School for Mental Health and Neuroscience (MHeNS), Maastricht University, Universiteitssingel 50, Maastricht, 6200 MD, The Netherlands. e.pishva@exeter.ac.uk.
3
Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, School for Mental Health and Neuroscience (MHeNS), Maastricht University, Universiteitssingel 50, Maastricht, 6200 MD, The Netherlands.
4
Laboratory of Translational Neuroscience, Department of Psychiatry, Psychosomatics and Psychotherapy, University of Wuerzburg, Fuechsleinstrasse 15, Wurzburg, 97080, Germany.

Abstract

Epigenetic mechanisms regulate gene expression, influencing protein levels and ultimately shaping phenotypes during life. However, both stochastic epigenetic variations and environmental reprogramming of the epigenome might influence neurodevelopment and ageing, and this may contribute to the origins of mental ill-health. Studying the role of epigenetic mechanisms is challenging, as genotype-, tissue- and cell type-dependent epigenetic changes have to be taken into account, while the nature of mental disorders also poses significant challenges for linking them with biological profiles. In this chapter, we summarise the current evidence suggesting the role of DNA methylation as a key epigenetic mechanism in major depressive disorder.

KEYWORDS:

Antidepressants; DNA methylation; Epigenetics; Major depressive diorders

PMID:
28523547
DOI:
10.1007/978-3-319-53889-1_10
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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