Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Korean J Orthod. 2017 May;47(3):186-194. doi: 10.4041/kjod.2017.47.3.186. Epub 2017 Mar 13.

Impact of skeletal divergence on oral health-related quality of life and self-reported jaw function.

Author information

1
Department of Oral Sciences, Sir John Walsh Research Institute, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.
2
Department of Biochemistry, School of Medical Sciences, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.
3
Department of Neuroscience, Reproductive Science and Oral Science, University of Naples "Federico II", Naples, Italy.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the differences in oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) and self-reported jaw function between patients with hyperdivergent and normodivergent facial types.

METHODS:

Eighty patients with a distinctively hyperdivergent facial type (mandibular plane angle greater than 2 standard deviations, or 42°) and 80 controls were individually matched according to age, sex, ethnicity, and treatment stage. Data were collected using self-report questionnaires such as the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14) and Jaw Functional Limitation Scale (JFLS-8).

RESULTS:

The mean age of the patients was 17.2 ± 4.6 years (range, 12-9 years), with most (65.0%) being female and of New Zealand European origin (91.3%). Individuals with hyperdivergent facial types had higher overall and social domain scores on the OHIP-14 (p < 0.05) than did the ones with normodivergent facial types. However, the intergroup differences in JFLS-8 scores were not significant (p > 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

Jaw function appears to be similar in individuals with hyperdivergent and normodivergent facial morphologies. However, those with hyperdivergent facial types are more likely to self-report poorer OHRQoL than are those with normal faces, especially in relation to social aspects.

KEYWORDS:

Hyperdivergence; Jaw function; Oral health-related quality of life; Vertical facial morphology

Conflict of interest statement

The authors report no commercial, proprietary, or financial interest in the products or companies described in this article.

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for The Korean Association of Orthodontists Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center