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Sleep Med. 2017 Jun;34:134-140. doi: 10.1016/j.sleep.2017.01.025. Epub 2017 Mar 30.

Brain perfusion during rapid-eye-movement sleep successfully identifies amnestic mild cognitive impairment.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, Université du Québec à Montréal, Montréal, Canada; Center for Advanced Research in Sleep Medicine, Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur de Montréal, Montréal, Canada.
2
Center for Advanced Research in Sleep Medicine, Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur de Montréal, Montréal, Canada.
3
Center for Advanced Research in Sleep Medicine, Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur de Montréal, Montréal, Canada; Faculty of Medicine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Canada.
4
Center for Advanced Research in Sleep Medicine, Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur de Montréal, Montréal, Canada; Department of Psychology, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Canada.
5
Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, Montréal, Canada; PERFORM Centre, Concordia University, Montréal, Canada.
6
McGill University Research Centre for Studies in Aging, Douglas Hospital, Verdun, Canada.
7
Faculty of Medicine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Canada; Research Center, Institut universitaire de gériatrie de Montréal, Montreal, Canada.
8
Department of Psychology, Université du Québec à Montréal, Montréal, Canada; Neurology Service, Hôpital Notre-Dame du CHUM, Montréal, Canada.
9
Center for Advanced Research in Sleep Medicine, Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur de Montréal, Montréal, Canada; Faculty of Medicine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Canada. Electronic address: jy.montplaisir@umontreal.ca.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Prodromal markers of Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been derived from wakefulness. However, brain perfusion during rapid-eye movement (REM) sleep could be a sensitive marker of amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), as activation of REM sleep relies more on the cholinergic system.

METHODS:

Eight subjects with aMCI, and 16 controls, underwent two single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scans with tracer injected during REM sleep then wakefulness.

RESULTS:

Perfusion in the anterior cingulate cortex was significantly decreased in aMCI cases compared to controls for both conditions. That defect was much larger and more severe in REM sleep (1795 voxels) compared to wakefulness (398 voxels), and extended to the middle cingulate cortex and the olfactory cortex. Hypoperfusion in the anterior cingulate cortex during REM sleep allowed better classification than hypoperfusion found in wakefulness (93.8 vs 81.3%).

CONCLUSION:

REM sleep imaging is a valuable tool with which to identify individuals at risk of developing AD.

KEYWORDS:

Alzheimer's disease; Biomarker; Mild cognitive impairment; Neuropsychology; Rapid-eye movement sleep; SPECT (single-photon emission computed tomography)

PMID:
28522082
DOI:
10.1016/j.sleep.2017.01.025
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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